How to Engage the Latino or African American Patient with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

Crossing Socioeconomic and Cultural Barriers

Miguel Martinez, Steven Maislos, Walter Rayford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Disparities based on race and ethnicity still exist in the US healthcare system. Such disparities are reflected in the diagnosis and treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) among African Americans and Latinos. The prevalence of risk factors for BPH and LUTS and symptom progression are higher in these populations, but treatment is less common. African American men and Latinos frequently have other serious comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome. Health plan constraints and variabilities, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, language, healthcare-seeking behaviors, and cultural beliefs and practices influence the treatment of BPH and LUTS, oftentimes resulting in unequal access to care or inferior quality of care. The provision of nondiscriminatory treatment poses a challenge to clinicians that can partially be addressed by improving the cultural competence of practitioners in minority communities. An awareness of the customs and healing traditions of African Americans and Latinos may also facilitate culturally appropriate care and improve outcomes, and the participation of clinicians in continuing education/professional development programs to increase knowledge about minority health issues is recommended. Conversely, improving the health literacy of African American and Latino patients with BPH and LUTS can help avoid ineffective nontraditional methods of treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
Volume121
Issue number8 SUPPL.2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2008

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Prostatic Hyperplasia
Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Minority Health
Cultural Competency
Delivery of Health Care
Health Literacy
Therapeutics
Quality of Health Care
Continuing Education
Social Class
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus
Cardiovascular Diseases
Language
Health
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

How to Engage the Latino or African American Patient with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia : Crossing Socioeconomic and Cultural Barriers. / Martinez, Miguel; Maislos, Steven; Rayford, Walter.

In: American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 121, No. 8 SUPPL.2, 01.08.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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