How to write a research paper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Busy strokologists often find little time for scientific writing. They sometimes develop a mental condition equivalent to that known by neurologists as writer's cramp. It may result in permanent damage to academic career. This paper provides advice how to prevent or treat this condition. Methods: Prepare your manuscript following the IMRaD principle (Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion), with every part supporting the key message. When writing, be concise. Clearly state your methods here, while data belong to Results. Successful submissions combine quality new data or new thinking with lucid presentation. Results: Provide data that answer the research question. Describe here most important numeric data and statistics, keeping in mind that the shorter you can present them, the better. The scientific community screens abstracts to decide which full text papers to read. Make your point with data, not arguments. Conclusions: Conclusions have to be based on the present study findings. The time of lengthy and unfounded speculations is over. A simple message in a clearly written manuscript will get noticed and may advance our understanding of stroke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-138
Number of pages4
JournalCerebrovascular Diseases
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 27 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Manuscripts
Research
Dystonic Disorders
Stroke
Neurologists
Data Accuracy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

How to write a research paper. / Alexandrov, Andrei.

In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, Vol. 18, No. 2, 27.08.2004, p. 135-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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