HTLV-1 and its neurological complications

R. B. Khan, Tulio Bertorini, M. C. Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND- Since its discovery in 1980, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) has been associated with a number of neurological diseases. The distribution of HTLV-1-associated neurological disease is worldwide. In endemic areas, up to 30% of the population may be infected with HTLV-1; however, only a small percentage of infected persons develops neurological disease. REVIEW SUMMARY- In 1986, HTLV-1 infection was reported in patients of chronic progressive myelopathy of uncertain etiology, and the disease entity was called HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Recently, HTLV-1 infection has been associated with polymyositis and uveitis. Interestingly, a single patient may display more than one syndrome. Although other neurological syndromes occur in HTLV-1-infected individuals, there is not enough epidemiologic data that show a strong association. Treatment of HTLV-1-associated neurological disease is challenging, and well-controlled studies are lacking. CONCLUSION- As neurologists and other scientists begin to understand the pathophysiology of HTLV-1 infection, improved therapies should be developed. Randomized trials with longer follow-up are required to understand the effect of treatment on disability and quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)271-278
Number of pages8
JournalNeurologist
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Human T-lymphotropic virus 1
T-Lymphocytes
Virus Diseases
Tropical Spastic Paraparesis
Polymyositis
Spinal Cord Diseases
Uveitis
Therapeutics
Quality of Life

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

HTLV-1 and its neurological complications. / Khan, R. B.; Bertorini, Tulio; Levin, M. C.

In: Neurologist, Vol. 7, No. 5, 01.01.2001, p. 271-278.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Khan, R. B. ; Bertorini, Tulio ; Levin, M. C. / HTLV-1 and its neurological complications. In: Neurologist. 2001 ; Vol. 7, No. 5. pp. 271-278.
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