Human factors in dynamic e-health systems and digital libraries

Arash Shaban-Nejad, Volker Haarslev

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

E-health systems and digital libraries deal with human health, requiring fast responses and real-time decision-making. Human intervention can be seen in the whole life cycle of biomedical systems. In fact, relations between patients, nurses, lab technicians, health insurers, and physicians are crucial in such systems, and should be encouraged when necessary. However, there are some issues that affect the successful implementation of such infrastructures. Man-machine interaction problems are not purely computational and need a deep understanding of human behavior. Many integrated health knowledge management systems, have employed various knowledgebases and ontologies as their conceptual backbone to facilitate human-machine communication. Ontologies facilitate sharing knowledge between human and machine; they try to capture knowledge from a domain of interest; when the knowledge changes, the definitions will be altered to provide meaningful and valid information. In this chapter, we review and survey the potential issues related to the human factor in an integrated dynamic e-health system composed of several interrelated knowledgebases, bio-ontologies and digital libraries by looking at different theories in social science, psychology, and cognitive science. We also investigate the potential of some advanced formalisms in the semantic web context such as employing intelligent agents to assist the human user in dealing with changes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBiomedical Knowledge Management
Subtitle of host publicationInfrastructures and Processes for E-Health Systems
PublisherIGI Global
Pages192-202
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9781605662664
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Fingerprint

Digital Libraries
Health
Knowledge Bases
Nurse-Patient Relations
Cognitive Science
Knowledge Management
Social Psychology
Insurance Carriers
Social Sciences
Life Cycle Stages
Semantics
Decision Making
Communication
Physicians

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Shaban-Nejad, A., & Haarslev, V. (2010). Human factors in dynamic e-health systems and digital libraries. In Biomedical Knowledge Management: Infrastructures and Processes for E-Health Systems (pp. 192-202). IGI Global. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-60566-266-4.ch013

Human factors in dynamic e-health systems and digital libraries. / Shaban-Nejad, Arash; Haarslev, Volker.

Biomedical Knowledge Management: Infrastructures and Processes for E-Health Systems. IGI Global, 2010. p. 192-202.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Shaban-Nejad, A & Haarslev, V 2010, Human factors in dynamic e-health systems and digital libraries. in Biomedical Knowledge Management: Infrastructures and Processes for E-Health Systems. IGI Global, pp. 192-202. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-60566-266-4.ch013
Shaban-Nejad A, Haarslev V. Human factors in dynamic e-health systems and digital libraries. In Biomedical Knowledge Management: Infrastructures and Processes for E-Health Systems. IGI Global. 2010. p. 192-202 https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-60566-266-4.ch013
Shaban-Nejad, Arash ; Haarslev, Volker. / Human factors in dynamic e-health systems and digital libraries. Biomedical Knowledge Management: Infrastructures and Processes for E-Health Systems. IGI Global, 2010. pp. 192-202
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