Human neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

Edwin Thomas, R. I. Lehrer, R. F. Rest

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMNs) take up opsonized microorganisms into phagosomes that fuse with secretory granules in the PMN cytoplasm to form phagolysosomes. Killing and digestion of microorganisms take place within phagolysosomes. Antimicrobial activities in phagolysosomes are divided into two classes. Oxygen (O2)-dependent mechanisms are expressed when PMNs undergo the "respiratory burst." An NADPH oxidase in the phagolysosome membrane is activated and reduces O2 to superoxide (O2-). O2 reduction is the first step in a series of reactions that produce toxic oxidants. For example, .O2- dismutases to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and the azurophil granule enzyme myeloperoxidase catalyzes the oxidation of Cl- by H2O2 to yield hypochlorous acid (HOCl). The reaction of HOCl with ammonia and amines modulates the toxicity of this oxidant. O2-independent antimicrobial mechanisms include the activities of lysosomal proteases, other hydrolytic enzymes, and proteins and peptides that bind to microorganisms and disrupt essential processes or structural components. For example, the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, cathepsin G, and the defensins are released into phagolysosomes from the azurophil granules. Proposed mechanisms of action of neutrophil antimicrobial agents, their range of microbial targets, and their possible interactions within phagolysosomes are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalReviews of Infectious Diseases
Volume10 Suppl 2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Phagosomes
Neutrophils
Hypochlorous Acid
Oxidants
Cathepsin G
Defensins
Respiratory Burst
NADPH Oxidase
Poisons
Secretory Vesicles
Enzymes
Anti-Infective Agents
Ammonia
Superoxides
Hydrogen Peroxide
Peroxidase
Amines
Digestion
Cytoplasm
Peptide Hydrolases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Thomas, E., Lehrer, R. I., & Rest, R. F. (1988). Human neutrophil antimicrobial activity. Reviews of Infectious Diseases, 10 Suppl 2.

Human neutrophil antimicrobial activity. / Thomas, Edwin; Lehrer, R. I.; Rest, R. F.

In: Reviews of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 10 Suppl 2, 01.01.1988.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Thomas, Edwin ; Lehrer, R. I. ; Rest, R. F. / Human neutrophil antimicrobial activity. In: Reviews of Infectious Diseases. 1988 ; Vol. 10 Suppl 2.
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