Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer

not just a sexually transmitted disease.

Wendy Likes, Joanne Itano

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the cause of virtually all cancers of the cervix, the fourth most common cancer in women in the United States. HPV is sexually transmitted, and the lifetime risk of contracting the virus is estimated to be 75%-90%. New methods of detecting HPV infection and cellular changes (dysplasia) caused by HPV can greatly reduce the mortality associated with this virus. More than 100 types of HPV exist and may be classified as low-, intermediate-, or high-risk in terms of causing cancer. The virus can cause genital warts, subclinical dysplasia, and cancer. Nurses play an important role in educating patients regarding HPV and preventive measures as well as in screening and treatment. Most women diagnosed with HPV need emotional support and factual information provided in a supportive, nonjudgmental manner. Nurses can meet this challenge and make a difference in reducing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)271-276
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Nurses
Viruses
Satellite Viruses
Condylomata Acuminata
Neoplasms
Papillomavirus Infections
Mortality
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer : not just a sexually transmitted disease. / Likes, Wendy; Itano, Joanne.

In: Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, Vol. 7, No. 3, 01.01.2003, p. 271-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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