Hydraulic fracturing

Paving the way for a sustainable future?

Jiangang Chen, Mohammed H. Al-Wadei, Rebekah C.M. Kennedy, Paul Terry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the introduction of hydraulic fracturing technology, the United States has become the largest natural gas producer in the world with a substantial portion of the production coming from shale plays. In this review, we examined current hydraulic fracturing literature including associated wastewater management on quantity and quality of groundwater. We conclude that proper documentation/reporting systems for wastewater discharge and spills need to be enforced at the federal, state, and industrial level. Furthermore, Underground Injection Control (UIC) requirements under SDWA should be extended to hydraulic fracturing operations regardless if diesel fuel is used as a fracturing fluid or not. One of the biggest barriers that hinder the advancement of our knowledge on the hydraulic fracturing process is the lack of transparency of chemicals used in the practice. Federal laws mandating hydraulic companies to disclose fracturing fluid composition and concentration not only to federal and state regulatory agencies but also to health care professionals would encourage this practice. The full disclosure of fracturing chemicals will allow future research to fill knowledge gaps for a better understanding of the impacts of hydraulic fracturing on human health and the environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number656824
JournalJournal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume2014
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Waste Water
Natural Gas
Gasoline
Groundwater
Disclosure
Documentation
Hydraulic Fracking
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
Injections
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Hydraulic fracturing : Paving the way for a sustainable future? / Chen, Jiangang; Al-Wadei, Mohammed H.; Kennedy, Rebekah C.M.; Terry, Paul.

In: Journal of Environmental and Public Health, Vol. 2014, 656824, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, Jiangang ; Al-Wadei, Mohammed H. ; Kennedy, Rebekah C.M. ; Terry, Paul. / Hydraulic fracturing : Paving the way for a sustainable future?. In: Journal of Environmental and Public Health. 2014 ; Vol. 2014.
@article{be7dbb64255c464f9111e8e25d2c631f,
title = "Hydraulic fracturing: Paving the way for a sustainable future?",
abstract = "With the introduction of hydraulic fracturing technology, the United States has become the largest natural gas producer in the world with a substantial portion of the production coming from shale plays. In this review, we examined current hydraulic fracturing literature including associated wastewater management on quantity and quality of groundwater. We conclude that proper documentation/reporting systems for wastewater discharge and spills need to be enforced at the federal, state, and industrial level. Furthermore, Underground Injection Control (UIC) requirements under SDWA should be extended to hydraulic fracturing operations regardless if diesel fuel is used as a fracturing fluid or not. One of the biggest barriers that hinder the advancement of our knowledge on the hydraulic fracturing process is the lack of transparency of chemicals used in the practice. Federal laws mandating hydraulic companies to disclose fracturing fluid composition and concentration not only to federal and state regulatory agencies but also to health care professionals would encourage this practice. The full disclosure of fracturing chemicals will allow future research to fill knowledge gaps for a better understanding of the impacts of hydraulic fracturing on human health and the environment.",
author = "Jiangang Chen and Al-Wadei, {Mohammed H.} and Kennedy, {Rebekah C.M.} and Paul Terry",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1155/2014/656824",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2014",
journal = "Journal of Environmental and Public Health",
issn = "1687-9805",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hydraulic fracturing

T2 - Paving the way for a sustainable future?

AU - Chen, Jiangang

AU - Al-Wadei, Mohammed H.

AU - Kennedy, Rebekah C.M.

AU - Terry, Paul

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - With the introduction of hydraulic fracturing technology, the United States has become the largest natural gas producer in the world with a substantial portion of the production coming from shale plays. In this review, we examined current hydraulic fracturing literature including associated wastewater management on quantity and quality of groundwater. We conclude that proper documentation/reporting systems for wastewater discharge and spills need to be enforced at the federal, state, and industrial level. Furthermore, Underground Injection Control (UIC) requirements under SDWA should be extended to hydraulic fracturing operations regardless if diesel fuel is used as a fracturing fluid or not. One of the biggest barriers that hinder the advancement of our knowledge on the hydraulic fracturing process is the lack of transparency of chemicals used in the practice. Federal laws mandating hydraulic companies to disclose fracturing fluid composition and concentration not only to federal and state regulatory agencies but also to health care professionals would encourage this practice. The full disclosure of fracturing chemicals will allow future research to fill knowledge gaps for a better understanding of the impacts of hydraulic fracturing on human health and the environment.

AB - With the introduction of hydraulic fracturing technology, the United States has become the largest natural gas producer in the world with a substantial portion of the production coming from shale plays. In this review, we examined current hydraulic fracturing literature including associated wastewater management on quantity and quality of groundwater. We conclude that proper documentation/reporting systems for wastewater discharge and spills need to be enforced at the federal, state, and industrial level. Furthermore, Underground Injection Control (UIC) requirements under SDWA should be extended to hydraulic fracturing operations regardless if diesel fuel is used as a fracturing fluid or not. One of the biggest barriers that hinder the advancement of our knowledge on the hydraulic fracturing process is the lack of transparency of chemicals used in the practice. Federal laws mandating hydraulic companies to disclose fracturing fluid composition and concentration not only to federal and state regulatory agencies but also to health care professionals would encourage this practice. The full disclosure of fracturing chemicals will allow future research to fill knowledge gaps for a better understanding of the impacts of hydraulic fracturing on human health and the environment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84899568384&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84899568384&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1155/2014/656824

DO - 10.1155/2014/656824

M3 - Article

VL - 2014

JO - Journal of Environmental and Public Health

JF - Journal of Environmental and Public Health

SN - 1687-9805

M1 - 656824

ER -