Hypertension and blood pressure awareness among American Indians of the northern plains.

K. S. Sharlin, Gregory Heath, E. S. Ford, T. K. Welty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compared self-reported and measured blood pressure among American Indians of the northern plains. In 1986, a group of American Indians from the northern plains was administered the Centers for Disease Control Behavioral Risk Factor Survey (which included a question about previous blood pressure measurements) and a health risk appraisal (which included blood pressure measurement). Approximately 18% of the respondents reported being told by a doctor, nurse, or other health professional that they had high blood pressure, and 11% actually had measured blood pressures of at least 140/90 mm Hg. Overall, only 50% of hypertensive participants correctly identified themselves as hypertensive (sensitivity); specificity was 92%, predictive value positive was 43%, predictive value negative was 94%, and efficiency (the proportion of individuals who correctly classified their blood pressure status as high or normal) was 87%. These findings agree with similar studies of hypertension awareness, and they indicate that lack of this awareness remains a significant problem in the fight against cardiovascular diseases and premature death among American Indians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-343
Number of pages7
JournalEthnicity & disease
Volume3
Issue number4
StatePublished - Sep 1 1993

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North American Indians
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Health Status Indicators
Premature Mortality
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Cardiovascular Diseases
Nurses
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Hypertension and blood pressure awareness among American Indians of the northern plains. / Sharlin, K. S.; Heath, Gregory; Ford, E. S.; Welty, T. K.

In: Ethnicity & disease, Vol. 3, No. 4, 01.09.1993, p. 337-343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharlin, K. S. ; Heath, Gregory ; Ford, E. S. ; Welty, T. K. / Hypertension and blood pressure awareness among American Indians of the northern plains. In: Ethnicity & disease. 1993 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 337-343.
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