Hypertension in the elderly

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypertension is the most important risk factor for cardiovascular events in the elderly, and it is present in more than 50% of the American population over 60 years of age. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure are directly related to increasing cardiovascular risk and systolic pressure becomes even more important in the elderly. Borderline isolated systolic hypertension confers an 80% likelihood of developing definite hypertension over 20 years, as well as a higher risk for cardiovascular events. The morbidity trials in the elderly, especially the Systolic Hypertension in the Elderly Program, have clearly demonstrated the benefits of treating hypertension in the elderly in all subgroups examined. Although these benefits have been seen with diuretic (and to a lesser extent β-blocker) regimens, physicians initiated therapy less often with these drugs during 1990 and 1991. All of the major classes of drugs are effective in lowering blood pressure in older whites, and calcium antagonists and diuretics are most effective in older black patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)561-567
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Cardiology
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hypertension
Blood Pressure
Diuretics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Calcium
Morbidity
Physicians
Population
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Hypertension in the elderly. / Cushman, William.

In: Current Opinion in Cardiology, Vol. 9, No. 5, 01.01.1994, p. 561-567.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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