Hypertensive heart disease

Lost equilibrium between parenchyma and stroma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Parenchyma (cardiac myocytes) and stroma (largely fibrillar type I and III collagens) reside in balanced equilibrium in the normal heart. A disruption in this equilibrium serves to alter myocardial structure and impair function. In hypertensive heart disease, excess stroma appears in the hypertrophied, pressure-overloaded left ventricle, as well as the nonhypertrophied, normotensive right ventricle. This underscores the fact that regulatory mechanisms governing myocyte growth and fibrous tissue formation are distinct from one another. Emerging evidence implicates circulating angiotensin II and aldosterone, as well as a local hormonal system, in the regulation of fibrosis. In linking hormones with fibrous tissue formation, cardioprotective and cardioreparative strategies that respectively prevent or regress an imbalance in parenchyma to stroma can be developed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)156-161
Number of pages6
JournalHeart Failure
Volume10
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Heart Ventricles
Heart Diseases
Collagen Type III
Collagen Type I
Aldosterone
Cardiac Myocytes
Angiotensin II
Muscle Cells
Fibrosis
Hormones
Pressure
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Hypertensive heart disease : Lost equilibrium between parenchyma and stroma. / Weber, Karl.

In: Heart Failure, Vol. 10, No. 4, 1994, p. 156-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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