Hypomagnesemia is prevalent in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncologist

Michael A. Ulm, Catherine H. Watson, Prethi Vaddadi, Jim Wan, Joseph Santoso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of and risk factors for hypomagnesemia in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncologist. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients undergoing surgery for gynecologic pathology from July 2011 to July 2015 by a single surgeon. Demographic data, surgical indication, surgery performed, preoperative laboratory values, postoperative laboratory values, and medical history were examined. Hypomagnesemia was defined as less than 1.8 mg/dL. Hypermagnesemia was defined as greater than 2.5 mg/dL. Results Six hundred sixty-nine patients were identified for analysis. One hundred ninety-seven patients had hypomagnesemia (29.4%). Four hundred sixty-six patients had normal magnesium levels (69.5%), and 6 patients had hypermagnesemia (1%). Among patients with benign disease, 24.9% had preoperative hypomagnesemia compared with 32.7% of patients with a gynecologic malignancy. African American race (P = 0.041), diabetes mellitus (P < 0.001), and malignancy (P = 0.029) were all associated with preoperative hypomagnesemia. Diabetes and major surgery were associated with postoperative hypomagnesemia (P = 0.012 and P = 0.048, respectively). Hypomagnesemia was associated with increased preoperative and postoperative pain (P = 0.049 and P < 0.001, respectively) as well as postoperative hypokalemia (P = 0.001). Age, body mass index, hypertension, cancer type, hematocrit, surgical indication, and length of hospital stay were not associated with hypomagnesemia. Conclusions Perioperative hypomagnesemia is prevalent in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncology, especially in patients who have a gynecologic malignancy. We recommend routine preoperative and postoperative evaluation of serum magnesium in all patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncologist.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1320-1326
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecological Cancer
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

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Gynecologic Surgical Procedures
Magnesium
Length of Stay
Neoplasms
Oncologists
Hypokalemia
Postoperative Pain
Hematocrit
African Americans
Diabetes Mellitus
Body Mass Index
Demography
Pathology
Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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Hypomagnesemia is prevalent in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncologist. / Ulm, Michael A.; Watson, Catherine H.; Vaddadi, Prethi; Wan, Jim; Santoso, Joseph.

In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, Vol. 26, No. 7, 01.09.2016, p. 1320-1326.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of and risk factors for hypomagnesemia in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncologist. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients undergoing surgery for gynecologic pathology from July 2011 to July 2015 by a single surgeon. Demographic data, surgical indication, surgery performed, preoperative laboratory values, postoperative laboratory values, and medical history were examined. Hypomagnesemia was defined as less than 1.8 mg/dL. Hypermagnesemia was defined as greater than 2.5 mg/dL. Results Six hundred sixty-nine patients were identified for analysis. One hundred ninety-seven patients had hypomagnesemia (29.4{\%}). Four hundred sixty-six patients had normal magnesium levels (69.5{\%}), and 6 patients had hypermagnesemia (1{\%}). Among patients with benign disease, 24.9{\%} had preoperative hypomagnesemia compared with 32.7{\%} of patients with a gynecologic malignancy. African American race (P = 0.041), diabetes mellitus (P < 0.001), and malignancy (P = 0.029) were all associated with preoperative hypomagnesemia. Diabetes and major surgery were associated with postoperative hypomagnesemia (P = 0.012 and P = 0.048, respectively). Hypomagnesemia was associated with increased preoperative and postoperative pain (P = 0.049 and P < 0.001, respectively) as well as postoperative hypokalemia (P = 0.001). Age, body mass index, hypertension, cancer type, hematocrit, surgical indication, and length of hospital stay were not associated with hypomagnesemia. Conclusions Perioperative hypomagnesemia is prevalent in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncology, especially in patients who have a gynecologic malignancy. We recommend routine preoperative and postoperative evaluation of serum magnesium in all patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncologist.",
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N2 - Objective The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of and risk factors for hypomagnesemia in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncologist. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients undergoing surgery for gynecologic pathology from July 2011 to July 2015 by a single surgeon. Demographic data, surgical indication, surgery performed, preoperative laboratory values, postoperative laboratory values, and medical history were examined. Hypomagnesemia was defined as less than 1.8 mg/dL. Hypermagnesemia was defined as greater than 2.5 mg/dL. Results Six hundred sixty-nine patients were identified for analysis. One hundred ninety-seven patients had hypomagnesemia (29.4%). Four hundred sixty-six patients had normal magnesium levels (69.5%), and 6 patients had hypermagnesemia (1%). Among patients with benign disease, 24.9% had preoperative hypomagnesemia compared with 32.7% of patients with a gynecologic malignancy. African American race (P = 0.041), diabetes mellitus (P < 0.001), and malignancy (P = 0.029) were all associated with preoperative hypomagnesemia. Diabetes and major surgery were associated with postoperative hypomagnesemia (P = 0.012 and P = 0.048, respectively). Hypomagnesemia was associated with increased preoperative and postoperative pain (P = 0.049 and P < 0.001, respectively) as well as postoperative hypokalemia (P = 0.001). Age, body mass index, hypertension, cancer type, hematocrit, surgical indication, and length of hospital stay were not associated with hypomagnesemia. Conclusions Perioperative hypomagnesemia is prevalent in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncology, especially in patients who have a gynecologic malignancy. We recommend routine preoperative and postoperative evaluation of serum magnesium in all patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncologist.

AB - Objective The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of and risk factors for hypomagnesemia in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncologist. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients undergoing surgery for gynecologic pathology from July 2011 to July 2015 by a single surgeon. Demographic data, surgical indication, surgery performed, preoperative laboratory values, postoperative laboratory values, and medical history were examined. Hypomagnesemia was defined as less than 1.8 mg/dL. Hypermagnesemia was defined as greater than 2.5 mg/dL. Results Six hundred sixty-nine patients were identified for analysis. One hundred ninety-seven patients had hypomagnesemia (29.4%). Four hundred sixty-six patients had normal magnesium levels (69.5%), and 6 patients had hypermagnesemia (1%). Among patients with benign disease, 24.9% had preoperative hypomagnesemia compared with 32.7% of patients with a gynecologic malignancy. African American race (P = 0.041), diabetes mellitus (P < 0.001), and malignancy (P = 0.029) were all associated with preoperative hypomagnesemia. Diabetes and major surgery were associated with postoperative hypomagnesemia (P = 0.012 and P = 0.048, respectively). Hypomagnesemia was associated with increased preoperative and postoperative pain (P = 0.049 and P < 0.001, respectively) as well as postoperative hypokalemia (P = 0.001). Age, body mass index, hypertension, cancer type, hematocrit, surgical indication, and length of hospital stay were not associated with hypomagnesemia. Conclusions Perioperative hypomagnesemia is prevalent in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncology, especially in patients who have a gynecologic malignancy. We recommend routine preoperative and postoperative evaluation of serum magnesium in all patients undergoing gynecologic surgery by a gynecologic oncologist.

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