Identification of a rapd marker linked to progressive rod-cone degeneration

Weikuan Gu, G. M. Acland, K. Ray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Progressive rod-cone degeneration (prcd) is an autosomal recessive disease of dogs first characterized in miniature poodles; allelic disorders are known to occur in several other breeds. The gene defect causing the disease is not known. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) analysis in studying diseases of dogs in general, and, in particular, to identify a molecular marker linked to the prcd locus. Methods: Genomic DNA was isolated from dogs belonging toprcrf-informative pedigrees. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was done using single 10-nucleotide long primers under low stringency. Amplification products were analyzed on agarose gel to identify polymorphisms between pairs of informative parents in the pedigrees, and a polymorphic DNA fragment of interest was cloned and sequenced. Longer primers were designed from the sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR), and PCR was then done to characterize the genotype of those dogs informative for both the RAPD marker and the disease locus. Results: From initial screening of 400 primers, a single primer was found to amplify a DNA fragment only from prcd affected dogs. PCR done with the longer primers designed from the SCAR identified a co-dominant bi-allelic polymorphism in the prcd pedigrees. Screening 4 pedigrees with this primer-pair identified 5 obligate recombinants among 26 informative offspring. A maximum combined LOD score of 2.3 was obtained for a theta of 19.2 cM. Conclusions: We have identified a RAPD marker linked to the prcd which will facilitate further mapping of the prcd locus. Also, we demonstrate the use of RAPD analysis in a mammalian species for which a genetic map is not yet available.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume38
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pedigree
DNA
Dog Diseases
Dogs
Genetic Markers
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sepharose
Cone-Rod Dystrophies
Nucleotides
Gels
Genotype
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Identification of a rapd marker linked to progressive rod-cone degeneration. / Gu, Weikuan; Acland, G. M.; Ray, K.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 38, No. 4, 1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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