Identification of language-specific brain activity using magnetoencephalography

P. G. Simos, J. I. Breier, G. Zouridakis, Andrew Papanicolaou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the present investigation was to explore the ability of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to identify brain areas involved in language comprehension. Event-related magnetic fields (ERFs) were recorded from 7 right-handed adults with no history of neurological disorder or learning disability as they engaged in an auditory and a visual word-recognition task. A face-recognition task served as control. During the later portion of the ERFs, activity sources from both language tasks tended to overlap in temporal and temporo-parietal cortices. There was a clear preponderance of such sources in the left compared to the right hemisphere in all participants. These findings demonstrate that MEG is a promising tool for identifying brain regions involved in the analysis of linguistic stimuli, in addition to the initial encoding of stimulus features.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)706-722
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Fingerprint

Magnetoencephalography
Magnetic Fields
Language
Parietal Lobe
Aptitude
Learning Disorders
Brain
Linguistics
Nervous System Diseases
Recognition (Psychology)
Facial Recognition

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Identification of language-specific brain activity using magnetoencephalography. / Simos, P. G.; Breier, J. I.; Zouridakis, G.; Papanicolaou, Andrew.

In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, Vol. 20, No. 5, 01.01.1998, p. 706-722.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Simos, P. G. ; Breier, J. I. ; Zouridakis, G. ; Papanicolaou, Andrew. / Identification of language-specific brain activity using magnetoencephalography. In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology. 1998 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 706-722.
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