Identification of Risk Factors for Refractory Status Epilepticus

Hayley A. Tatro, Leslie A. Hamilton, Cassey Peters, Anthony Rowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study is to identify risk factors for the development of refractory status epilepticus (RSE). Methods: This was an IRB-approved, retrospective case control study that included patients admitted with status epilepticus between August 1, 2014, and July 31, 2017. Cases were defined as those with RSE, and controls were those who did not develop RSE. A bivariate analysis was conducted comparing those with RSE and those without RSE. A stepwise logistic regression model was constructed predicting for progression to RSE. Risk factors for progression to RSE were extrapolated from this model. Results: A total of 184 patients met inclusion criteria for the study (99 controls and 49 cases). After adjusting for covariates in the logistic regression, patients with convulsive seizures had a lower odds of developing RSE (odds ratio [OR] = 0.375; 95% CI = 0.148 to 0.951; P = 0.0388). Treatment with benzodiazepines plus levetiracetam had a higher odds of developing RSE (OR = 3.804; 95% CI = 1.523 to 9.499; P = 0.0042). Conclusion and Relevance: This study found that patients with convulsive seizures had a lower odds of developing RSE. In addition, patients treated with benzodiazepines and levetiracetam had a higher odds of developing RSE. This information can be used to potentially identify patients at higher risk of developing RSE, so that treatment can be modified to reduce morbidity and mortality. These results may warrant further investigation into the effectiveness of levetiracetam as a first-line agent for the treatment of SE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnals of Pharmacotherapy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Status Epilepticus
Seizures
etiracetam
Logistic Models
Benzodiazepines
Odds Ratio
Research Ethics Committees
Case-Control Studies
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Identification of Risk Factors for Refractory Status Epilepticus. / Tatro, Hayley A.; Hamilton, Leslie A.; Peters, Cassey; Rowe, Anthony.

In: Annals of Pharmacotherapy, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tatro, Hayley A. ; Hamilton, Leslie A. ; Peters, Cassey ; Rowe, Anthony. / Identification of Risk Factors for Refractory Status Epilepticus. In: Annals of Pharmacotherapy. 2019.
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abstract = "Objective: The objective of this study is to identify risk factors for the development of refractory status epilepticus (RSE). Methods: This was an IRB-approved, retrospective case control study that included patients admitted with status epilepticus between August 1, 2014, and July 31, 2017. Cases were defined as those with RSE, and controls were those who did not develop RSE. A bivariate analysis was conducted comparing those with RSE and those without RSE. A stepwise logistic regression model was constructed predicting for progression to RSE. Risk factors for progression to RSE were extrapolated from this model. Results: A total of 184 patients met inclusion criteria for the study (99 controls and 49 cases). After adjusting for covariates in the logistic regression, patients with convulsive seizures had a lower odds of developing RSE (odds ratio [OR] = 0.375; 95{\%} CI = 0.148 to 0.951; P = 0.0388). Treatment with benzodiazepines plus levetiracetam had a higher odds of developing RSE (OR = 3.804; 95{\%} CI = 1.523 to 9.499; P = 0.0042). Conclusion and Relevance: This study found that patients with convulsive seizures had a lower odds of developing RSE. In addition, patients treated with benzodiazepines and levetiracetam had a higher odds of developing RSE. This information can be used to potentially identify patients at higher risk of developing RSE, so that treatment can be modified to reduce morbidity and mortality. These results may warrant further investigation into the effectiveness of levetiracetam as a first-line agent for the treatment of SE.",
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