Identification of two additional translation products from the matrix (M) gene that contribute to vesicular stomatitis virus cytopathology

Himangi R. Jayakar, Michael A. Whitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The matrix (M) protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a multifunctional protein that is responsible for condensation of the ribonucleocapsid core during virus assembly and also plays a critical role in virus budding. The M protein is also responsible for most of the cytopathic effects (CPE) observed in infected cells. VSV CPE include inhibition of host gene expression, disablement of nucleocytoplasmic transport, and disruption of the host cytoskeleton, which results in rounding of infected cells. In this report, we show that the VSV M gene codes for two additional polypeptides, which we have named M2 and M3. These proteins are synthesized from downstream methionines in the same open reading frame as the M protein (which we refer to here as M1) and lack the first 32 (M2) or 50 (M3) amino acids of M1 Infection of cells with a recombinant virus that does not express M2 and M3 (M33,51A) resulted in a delay in cell rounding, but virus yield was not affected. Transient expression of M2 and M3 alone caused cell rounding similar to that with the full-length M1 protein, suggesting that the cell-rounding function of the M protein does not require the N-terminal 50 amino acids. To determine if M2 and M3 were sufficient for VSV-mediated CPE, both M2 and M3 were expressed from a separate cistron in a VSV mutant background that readily establishes persistent infections and that normally lacks CPE. Infection of cells with the recombinant virus that expressed M2 and M3 resulted in cell rounding indistinguishable from that with the wild-type recombinant virus. These results suggest that M2 and M3 are important for cell rounding and may play an important role in viral cytopathogenesis. To our knowledge, this is first report of the multiple coding capacities of a rhabdovirus matrix gene.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8011-8018
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume76
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 5 2002

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Vesiculovirus
Vesicular Stomatitis
translation (genetics)
Viruses
cytopathogenicity
Genes
genes
cells
viruses
proteins
Proteins
Infection
nucleocytoplasmic transport
Rhabdoviridae
infection
Virus Release
Virus Assembly
Amino Acids
amino acids
Cell Nucleus Active Transport

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

Cite this

Identification of two additional translation products from the matrix (M) gene that contribute to vesicular stomatitis virus cytopathology. / Jayakar, Himangi R.; Whitt, Michael A.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 76, No. 16, 05.08.2002, p. 8011-8018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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