Image enhancement of the mandibular condyle through digital subtraction

Thomas E. Southard, Edward Harris, Robert G. Walter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of conventional radiography to visualize the mandibular condylar articulating surface is limited by the superimposition of surrounding bony elements, which can be termed structured noise. This study investigated the application of digital subtraction to reduce such noise. Two conventional radiographs were made of a temporomandibular joint: first a reference radiograph with the condyle seated in the glenoid fossa (simulating a patient with mouth closed), then a radiograph from the identical orientation but with the condyle translated slightly downward and forward (simulating mouth partially opened). The radiographs were digitized and, on a pixel-by-pixel basis, the intensity value of the second image was subtracted from the reference image to produce a third, subtracted image. The subtracted image provided a significantly improved visualization of the condyle's superior surface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)645-647
Number of pages3
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology
Volume64
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

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Image Enhancement
Mandibular Condyle
Bone and Bones
Mouth
Noise
Glenoid Cavity
Temporomandibular Joint
Radiography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Image enhancement of the mandibular condyle through digital subtraction. / Southard, Thomas E.; Harris, Edward; Walter, Robert G.

In: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Vol. 64, No. 5, 01.01.1987, p. 645-647.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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