Imaging characteristic analysis of metastatic spine lesions from breast, prostate, lung, and renal cell carcinomas for surgical planning: Osteolytic versus osteoblastic

Justin A. Reddington, Gustavo A. Mendez, Alex Ching, Charlotte Dai Kubicky, Paul Klimo, Brian T. Ragel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Surgeons treating metastatic spine disease can use computed tomography (CT) imaging to determine whether lesions are osteolytic, osteoblastic, or mixed. This enables treatment that considers the structural integrity of the vertebral body (VB), which is impaired with lytic lesions but not blastic lesions. The authors analyzed CT imaging characteristics of spine metastasis from breast, lung, prostate, and renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) to determine the metastasis patterns of each of these common tumors. Methods: The authors identified patients with metastatic spine disease treated during a 3-year period. Variables studied included age, sex, and cancer type. Lesions from breast, lung, prostate, and RCC primary lesions were selected for imaging analysis. Results: Sixty-six patients were identified: 17 had breast metastasis, 14 prostate, 18 lung, and 17 RCC. Breast cancer metastasis involved 33% of VBs with 56%, 20%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Prostate cancer metastasis involved 35% of VBs with 14%, 62%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Lung cancer metastasis involved 13% of VBs with 64%, 33%, and 3% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. RCC metastasis involved 11% of VBs with 91%, 7%, and 2% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed lesions, respectively. Conclusions: To improve surgical planning, we advocate the use of CT prior to surgery to evaluate whether spine metastases are osteolytic or osteoblastic. In cases of osteolytic lesions, the concern is of segmental instability requiring reconstruction and the risk for screw pull out should instrumentation be considered. In cases of osteoblastic lesions, surgeons should consider debulking dense bone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S361-S365
JournalSurgical Neurology International
Volume7
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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Renal Cell Carcinoma
Prostate
Breast
Spine
Neoplasm Metastasis
Lung
Tomography
Lung Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Bone and Bones

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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Imaging characteristic analysis of metastatic spine lesions from breast, prostate, lung, and renal cell carcinomas for surgical planning : Osteolytic versus osteoblastic. / Reddington, Justin A.; Mendez, Gustavo A.; Ching, Alex; Kubicky, Charlotte Dai; Klimo, Paul; Ragel, Brian T.

In: Surgical Neurology International, Vol. 7, No. 14, 01.11.2016, p. S361-S365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reddington, Justin A. ; Mendez, Gustavo A. ; Ching, Alex ; Kubicky, Charlotte Dai ; Klimo, Paul ; Ragel, Brian T. / Imaging characteristic analysis of metastatic spine lesions from breast, prostate, lung, and renal cell carcinomas for surgical planning : Osteolytic versus osteoblastic. In: Surgical Neurology International. 2016 ; Vol. 7, No. 14. pp. S361-S365.
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AU - Klimo, Paul

AU - Ragel, Brian T.

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N2 - Background: Surgeons treating metastatic spine disease can use computed tomography (CT) imaging to determine whether lesions are osteolytic, osteoblastic, or mixed. This enables treatment that considers the structural integrity of the vertebral body (VB), which is impaired with lytic lesions but not blastic lesions. The authors analyzed CT imaging characteristics of spine metastasis from breast, lung, prostate, and renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) to determine the metastasis patterns of each of these common tumors. Methods: The authors identified patients with metastatic spine disease treated during a 3-year period. Variables studied included age, sex, and cancer type. Lesions from breast, lung, prostate, and RCC primary lesions were selected for imaging analysis. Results: Sixty-six patients were identified: 17 had breast metastasis, 14 prostate, 18 lung, and 17 RCC. Breast cancer metastasis involved 33% of VBs with 56%, 20%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Prostate cancer metastasis involved 35% of VBs with 14%, 62%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Lung cancer metastasis involved 13% of VBs with 64%, 33%, and 3% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. RCC metastasis involved 11% of VBs with 91%, 7%, and 2% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed lesions, respectively. Conclusions: To improve surgical planning, we advocate the use of CT prior to surgery to evaluate whether spine metastases are osteolytic or osteoblastic. In cases of osteolytic lesions, the concern is of segmental instability requiring reconstruction and the risk for screw pull out should instrumentation be considered. In cases of osteoblastic lesions, surgeons should consider debulking dense bone.

AB - Background: Surgeons treating metastatic spine disease can use computed tomography (CT) imaging to determine whether lesions are osteolytic, osteoblastic, or mixed. This enables treatment that considers the structural integrity of the vertebral body (VB), which is impaired with lytic lesions but not blastic lesions. The authors analyzed CT imaging characteristics of spine metastasis from breast, lung, prostate, and renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) to determine the metastasis patterns of each of these common tumors. Methods: The authors identified patients with metastatic spine disease treated during a 3-year period. Variables studied included age, sex, and cancer type. Lesions from breast, lung, prostate, and RCC primary lesions were selected for imaging analysis. Results: Sixty-six patients were identified: 17 had breast metastasis, 14 prostate, 18 lung, and 17 RCC. Breast cancer metastasis involved 33% of VBs with 56%, 20%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Prostate cancer metastasis involved 35% of VBs with 14%, 62%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Lung cancer metastasis involved 13% of VBs with 64%, 33%, and 3% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. RCC metastasis involved 11% of VBs with 91%, 7%, and 2% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed lesions, respectively. Conclusions: To improve surgical planning, we advocate the use of CT prior to surgery to evaluate whether spine metastases are osteolytic or osteoblastic. In cases of osteolytic lesions, the concern is of segmental instability requiring reconstruction and the risk for screw pull out should instrumentation be considered. In cases of osteoblastic lesions, surgeons should consider debulking dense bone.

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