Immediate reconstruction of the perineal wound with gracilis muscle flaps following abdominoperineal resection and intraoperative radiation therapy for recurrent carcinoma of the rectum

David Shibata, William Hyland, Paul Busse, H. Katherine Kim, Steven M. Sentovich, Glenn Steele, Ronald Bleday

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Abstract

Background: Morbidity associated with a nonhealing perineal wound is the most common complication following proctectomy, particularly in the setting of recurrent carcinoma of the rectum and radiation therapy. Immediate reconstruction using the gracilis myocutaneous and muscle flaps significantly reduces the incidence of major infection associated with perineal wound closure. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of immediate reconstruction of the perineal wound using a gracilis flap in patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection and intraoperative radiation therapy. Methods: This study retrospectively reviewed our experience with immediate pelvic reconstruction using gracilis muscle flaps for patients undergoing rectal extirpation and irradiation for recurrent carcinoma of the rectum. From 1990 to 1995, 16 patients underwent abdominoperineal resection (APR) or pelvic exenteration accompanied by immediate wound closure with unilateral or bilateral gracilis muscle flaps. Morbidity and mortality outcomes were compared to those of 24 patients from our institution who, between 1988 and 1992, underwent proctectomy and irradiation for recurrent rectal carcinoma with primary closure of the perineal wound. Results: Major complications (i.e., major infection requiring hospitalization and/or operation) occurred in 2 (12%) of the patients with gracilis flaps versus 11 (46%) of the patients with primary closure (P = .028 by χ2 analysis for flap vs. primary closure). Minor complications (i.e., persistent sinus and subcutaneous abscess) occurred in 4 (25%) of the patients with gracilis flaps versus 5 (21%) of those with primary closure. Conclusion: Immediate perineal reconstruction using the gracilis myocutaneous flap following proctectomy and irradiation for recurrent rectal carcinoma significantly reduces the incidence of major infection associated with perineal wound closure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-37
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Surgical Oncology
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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Rectum
Radiotherapy
Carcinoma
Wounds and Injuries
Myocutaneous Flap
Infection
Pelvic Exenteration
Morbidity
Incidence
Gracilis Muscle
Abscess
Hospitalization
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

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Immediate reconstruction of the perineal wound with gracilis muscle flaps following abdominoperineal resection and intraoperative radiation therapy for recurrent carcinoma of the rectum. / Shibata, David; Hyland, William; Busse, Paul; Kim, H. Katherine; Sentovich, Steven M.; Steele, Glenn; Bleday, Ronald.

In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.01.1999, p. 33-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shibata, David ; Hyland, William ; Busse, Paul ; Kim, H. Katherine ; Sentovich, Steven M. ; Steele, Glenn ; Bleday, Ronald. / Immediate reconstruction of the perineal wound with gracilis muscle flaps following abdominoperineal resection and intraoperative radiation therapy for recurrent carcinoma of the rectum. In: Annals of Surgical Oncology. 1999 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 33-37.
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abstract = "Background: Morbidity associated with a nonhealing perineal wound is the most common complication following proctectomy, particularly in the setting of recurrent carcinoma of the rectum and radiation therapy. Immediate reconstruction using the gracilis myocutaneous and muscle flaps significantly reduces the incidence of major infection associated with perineal wound closure. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of immediate reconstruction of the perineal wound using a gracilis flap in patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection and intraoperative radiation therapy. Methods: This study retrospectively reviewed our experience with immediate pelvic reconstruction using gracilis muscle flaps for patients undergoing rectal extirpation and irradiation for recurrent carcinoma of the rectum. From 1990 to 1995, 16 patients underwent abdominoperineal resection (APR) or pelvic exenteration accompanied by immediate wound closure with unilateral or bilateral gracilis muscle flaps. Morbidity and mortality outcomes were compared to those of 24 patients from our institution who, between 1988 and 1992, underwent proctectomy and irradiation for recurrent rectal carcinoma with primary closure of the perineal wound. Results: Major complications (i.e., major infection requiring hospitalization and/or operation) occurred in 2 (12{\%}) of the patients with gracilis flaps versus 11 (46{\%}) of the patients with primary closure (P = .028 by χ2 analysis for flap vs. primary closure). Minor complications (i.e., persistent sinus and subcutaneous abscess) occurred in 4 (25{\%}) of the patients with gracilis flaps versus 5 (21{\%}) of those with primary closure. Conclusion: Immediate perineal reconstruction using the gracilis myocutaneous flap following proctectomy and irradiation for recurrent rectal carcinoma significantly reduces the incidence of major infection associated with perineal wound closure.",
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T1 - Immediate reconstruction of the perineal wound with gracilis muscle flaps following abdominoperineal resection and intraoperative radiation therapy for recurrent carcinoma of the rectum

AU - Shibata, David

AU - Hyland, William

AU - Busse, Paul

AU - Kim, H. Katherine

AU - Sentovich, Steven M.

AU - Steele, Glenn

AU - Bleday, Ronald

PY - 1999/1/1

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N2 - Background: Morbidity associated with a nonhealing perineal wound is the most common complication following proctectomy, particularly in the setting of recurrent carcinoma of the rectum and radiation therapy. Immediate reconstruction using the gracilis myocutaneous and muscle flaps significantly reduces the incidence of major infection associated with perineal wound closure. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of immediate reconstruction of the perineal wound using a gracilis flap in patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection and intraoperative radiation therapy. Methods: This study retrospectively reviewed our experience with immediate pelvic reconstruction using gracilis muscle flaps for patients undergoing rectal extirpation and irradiation for recurrent carcinoma of the rectum. From 1990 to 1995, 16 patients underwent abdominoperineal resection (APR) or pelvic exenteration accompanied by immediate wound closure with unilateral or bilateral gracilis muscle flaps. Morbidity and mortality outcomes were compared to those of 24 patients from our institution who, between 1988 and 1992, underwent proctectomy and irradiation for recurrent rectal carcinoma with primary closure of the perineal wound. Results: Major complications (i.e., major infection requiring hospitalization and/or operation) occurred in 2 (12%) of the patients with gracilis flaps versus 11 (46%) of the patients with primary closure (P = .028 by χ2 analysis for flap vs. primary closure). Minor complications (i.e., persistent sinus and subcutaneous abscess) occurred in 4 (25%) of the patients with gracilis flaps versus 5 (21%) of those with primary closure. Conclusion: Immediate perineal reconstruction using the gracilis myocutaneous flap following proctectomy and irradiation for recurrent rectal carcinoma significantly reduces the incidence of major infection associated with perineal wound closure.

AB - Background: Morbidity associated with a nonhealing perineal wound is the most common complication following proctectomy, particularly in the setting of recurrent carcinoma of the rectum and radiation therapy. Immediate reconstruction using the gracilis myocutaneous and muscle flaps significantly reduces the incidence of major infection associated with perineal wound closure. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of immediate reconstruction of the perineal wound using a gracilis flap in patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection and intraoperative radiation therapy. Methods: This study retrospectively reviewed our experience with immediate pelvic reconstruction using gracilis muscle flaps for patients undergoing rectal extirpation and irradiation for recurrent carcinoma of the rectum. From 1990 to 1995, 16 patients underwent abdominoperineal resection (APR) or pelvic exenteration accompanied by immediate wound closure with unilateral or bilateral gracilis muscle flaps. Morbidity and mortality outcomes were compared to those of 24 patients from our institution who, between 1988 and 1992, underwent proctectomy and irradiation for recurrent rectal carcinoma with primary closure of the perineal wound. Results: Major complications (i.e., major infection requiring hospitalization and/or operation) occurred in 2 (12%) of the patients with gracilis flaps versus 11 (46%) of the patients with primary closure (P = .028 by χ2 analysis for flap vs. primary closure). Minor complications (i.e., persistent sinus and subcutaneous abscess) occurred in 4 (25%) of the patients with gracilis flaps versus 5 (21%) of those with primary closure. Conclusion: Immediate perineal reconstruction using the gracilis myocutaneous flap following proctectomy and irradiation for recurrent rectal carcinoma significantly reduces the incidence of major infection associated with perineal wound closure.

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