Immunity to type IX collagen in rodents

A study of type IX collagen for autoimmune and arthritogenic activities

M. A. Cremer, X. J. Ye, K. Terato, M. M. Griffiths, W. C. Watson, Andrew Kang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Type IX collagen (CIX), a cartilage-specific glycoprotein, constitutes ≤ 10% of cartilage collagen. To ascertain whether CIX can induce arthritis as shown for type II and XI collagen (CII and CXI), outbred rats were sensitized with bovine, chick and human CIX; inbred rats, mice, and guinea pigs were sensitized with bovine CIX. Mice and guinea pigs proved resistant to arthritis, as did rats sensitized with CIX/Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA). Arthritis was seen in rats when 100μg of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) were added to FIA, but seldom with smaller doses of Mtb, suggesting the arthritis was adjuvant-induced. High levels of antibodies to rat CIX, containing complement-fixing subclasses, were detected in rat sera in addition to DTH and lymphocyte proliferation responses to rat CIX. Given the potential for CIX-induced disease, CIX-sensitized rats were injected intraperitoneally with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to stimulate proinflammatory cytokine release, and intra-articularly with rat CIX to stimulate arthritis. LPS stimulation was ineffective; however, intra-articularly injected CIX produced transient synovitis. When rats with stable adjuvant arthritis were sensitized with CIX/FIA, significant increases in paw volume were measured compared with controls given CI/FIA. Immunohistochemical studies of actively and passively sensitized rats revealed deposits of CIX antibody, but not C3, at the joint margins where proteoglycan staining was weak. Together, these findings suggest that autoimmunity to CIX, in contrast to CII and CXI, is not directly pathogenic but may contribute to joint injury provided arthritis is initiated by an independent disease process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-382
Number of pages8
JournalClinical and Experimental Immunology
Volume112
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 22 1998

Fingerprint

Collagen Type IX
Immunity
Rodentia
Arthritis
Experimental Arthritis
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Lipopolysaccharides
Guinea Pigs
Collagen Type XI
Joints
Synovitis
Collagen Type II
Antibodies
Proteoglycans
Autoimmunity
Cartilage

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology

Cite this

Immunity to type IX collagen in rodents : A study of type IX collagen for autoimmune and arthritogenic activities. / Cremer, M. A.; Ye, X. J.; Terato, K.; Griffiths, M. M.; Watson, W. C.; Kang, Andrew.

In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, Vol. 112, No. 3, 22.06.1998, p. 375-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cremer, M. A. ; Ye, X. J. ; Terato, K. ; Griffiths, M. M. ; Watson, W. C. ; Kang, Andrew. / Immunity to type IX collagen in rodents : A study of type IX collagen for autoimmune and arthritogenic activities. In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology. 1998 ; Vol. 112, No. 3. pp. 375-382.
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