Immunohistochemical localization of NMDA- and AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits in the basal ganglia of red-eared turtles

Michael Fowler, Loreta Medina, Anton Reiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Corticostriatal and thalamostriatal projection systems have been shown to utilize glutamate as a neurotransmitter in mammals and birds. Although corticostriatal and thalamostriatal projection systems have been demonstrated in turtles, it is uncertain whether they too use glutamate as their neurotransmitter. Immunohistochemical localization of glutamate and of NMDA- and AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits (NMDAR2A/B, GluR1, GluR2/3, and GluR4) were used to address this issue. Numerous medium-sized neurons that were rich in NMDAR2A/B and GluR2/3 were observed in the striatal part of the basal ganglia of red-eared turtles. Smaller numbers of medium- sized neurons and some large neurons rich in the GluR1 and GluR4 subunits were also observed in the striatum. The striatal neuropil was notably rich in GluR1, GluR2/3 and NMDAR2A/B subunits. The pallidal region was specifically rich in large neurons possessing GluR4 subunits. Consistent with the glutamate receptors on striatal and pallidal neurons, sources of input to the striatum and pallidum in turtle such as the dorsomedial and dorsolateral thalamic nuclei (which appear to correspond to intralaminar thalamic nuclei), telencephalic pallial cell groups, and the apparent subthalamic nucleus homologue were rich in glutamatergic neurons. The results show that the thalamostriatal, corticostriatal and subthalamo-pallidal projection systems of turtles are glutamatergic and that similar basal ganglia cell types in turtles and mammals have largely similar glutamate receptor characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)276-289
Number of pages14
JournalBrain, Behavior and Evolution
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Turtles
AMPA Receptors
Glutamate Receptors
N-Methylaspartate
Basal Ganglia
Neurons
Corpus Striatum
Glutamic Acid
Neurotransmitter Agents
Mammals
Intralaminar Thalamic Nuclei
Mediodorsal Thalamic Nucleus
Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors
Subthalamic Nucleus
Telencephalon
alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid
Globus Pallidus
Neuropil
Birds

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Immunohistochemical localization of NMDA- and AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits in the basal ganglia of red-eared turtles. / Fowler, Michael; Medina, Loreta; Reiner, Anton.

In: Brain, Behavior and Evolution, Vol. 54, No. 5, 01.01.1999, p. 276-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e4768e742c514e0c9900014ec0f73b19,
title = "Immunohistochemical localization of NMDA- and AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits in the basal ganglia of red-eared turtles",
abstract = "Corticostriatal and thalamostriatal projection systems have been shown to utilize glutamate as a neurotransmitter in mammals and birds. Although corticostriatal and thalamostriatal projection systems have been demonstrated in turtles, it is uncertain whether they too use glutamate as their neurotransmitter. Immunohistochemical localization of glutamate and of NMDA- and AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits (NMDAR2A/B, GluR1, GluR2/3, and GluR4) were used to address this issue. Numerous medium-sized neurons that were rich in NMDAR2A/B and GluR2/3 were observed in the striatal part of the basal ganglia of red-eared turtles. Smaller numbers of medium- sized neurons and some large neurons rich in the GluR1 and GluR4 subunits were also observed in the striatum. The striatal neuropil was notably rich in GluR1, GluR2/3 and NMDAR2A/B subunits. The pallidal region was specifically rich in large neurons possessing GluR4 subunits. Consistent with the glutamate receptors on striatal and pallidal neurons, sources of input to the striatum and pallidum in turtle such as the dorsomedial and dorsolateral thalamic nuclei (which appear to correspond to intralaminar thalamic nuclei), telencephalic pallial cell groups, and the apparent subthalamic nucleus homologue were rich in glutamatergic neurons. The results show that the thalamostriatal, corticostriatal and subthalamo-pallidal projection systems of turtles are glutamatergic and that similar basal ganglia cell types in turtles and mammals have largely similar glutamate receptor characteristics.",
author = "Michael Fowler and Loreta Medina and Anton Reiner",
year = "1999",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1159/000006628",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "276--289",
journal = "Brain, Behavior and Evolution",
issn = "0006-8977",
publisher = "S. Karger AG",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Immunohistochemical localization of NMDA- and AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits in the basal ganglia of red-eared turtles

AU - Fowler, Michael

AU - Medina, Loreta

AU - Reiner, Anton

PY - 1999/1/1

Y1 - 1999/1/1

N2 - Corticostriatal and thalamostriatal projection systems have been shown to utilize glutamate as a neurotransmitter in mammals and birds. Although corticostriatal and thalamostriatal projection systems have been demonstrated in turtles, it is uncertain whether they too use glutamate as their neurotransmitter. Immunohistochemical localization of glutamate and of NMDA- and AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits (NMDAR2A/B, GluR1, GluR2/3, and GluR4) were used to address this issue. Numerous medium-sized neurons that were rich in NMDAR2A/B and GluR2/3 were observed in the striatal part of the basal ganglia of red-eared turtles. Smaller numbers of medium- sized neurons and some large neurons rich in the GluR1 and GluR4 subunits were also observed in the striatum. The striatal neuropil was notably rich in GluR1, GluR2/3 and NMDAR2A/B subunits. The pallidal region was specifically rich in large neurons possessing GluR4 subunits. Consistent with the glutamate receptors on striatal and pallidal neurons, sources of input to the striatum and pallidum in turtle such as the dorsomedial and dorsolateral thalamic nuclei (which appear to correspond to intralaminar thalamic nuclei), telencephalic pallial cell groups, and the apparent subthalamic nucleus homologue were rich in glutamatergic neurons. The results show that the thalamostriatal, corticostriatal and subthalamo-pallidal projection systems of turtles are glutamatergic and that similar basal ganglia cell types in turtles and mammals have largely similar glutamate receptor characteristics.

AB - Corticostriatal and thalamostriatal projection systems have been shown to utilize glutamate as a neurotransmitter in mammals and birds. Although corticostriatal and thalamostriatal projection systems have been demonstrated in turtles, it is uncertain whether they too use glutamate as their neurotransmitter. Immunohistochemical localization of glutamate and of NMDA- and AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits (NMDAR2A/B, GluR1, GluR2/3, and GluR4) were used to address this issue. Numerous medium-sized neurons that were rich in NMDAR2A/B and GluR2/3 were observed in the striatal part of the basal ganglia of red-eared turtles. Smaller numbers of medium- sized neurons and some large neurons rich in the GluR1 and GluR4 subunits were also observed in the striatum. The striatal neuropil was notably rich in GluR1, GluR2/3 and NMDAR2A/B subunits. The pallidal region was specifically rich in large neurons possessing GluR4 subunits. Consistent with the glutamate receptors on striatal and pallidal neurons, sources of input to the striatum and pallidum in turtle such as the dorsomedial and dorsolateral thalamic nuclei (which appear to correspond to intralaminar thalamic nuclei), telencephalic pallial cell groups, and the apparent subthalamic nucleus homologue were rich in glutamatergic neurons. The results show that the thalamostriatal, corticostriatal and subthalamo-pallidal projection systems of turtles are glutamatergic and that similar basal ganglia cell types in turtles and mammals have largely similar glutamate receptor characteristics.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033426860&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033426860&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1159/000006628

DO - 10.1159/000006628

M3 - Article

C2 - 10640787

AN - SCOPUS:0033426860

VL - 54

SP - 276

EP - 289

JO - Brain, Behavior and Evolution

JF - Brain, Behavior and Evolution

SN - 0006-8977

IS - 5

ER -