Immunohistochemical localization of NQO1 in epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia and in donor eyes

Lee P. Schelonka, David Siegel, Matthew Wilson, Alex Meininger, David Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE. To examine the expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1, DT-diaphorase), a potential bioactivating enzyme for mitomycin C in corneal and conjunctival epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia and in normal tissues from human donor eyes, by immunohistochemistry. METHODS. Formalin- fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of human donor eyes and tissue sections with histologic diagnoses of corneal and conjunctival epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia from the Eye Pathology Laboratory, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center were analyzed. Detection of NQO1 in tissues was performed using standard immunohistochemical techniques with monoclonal antibodies against NQO1 and immunoperoxidase staining. RESULTS. All 20 tumors stained positive for NQO1. In seven eyes from four donors, positive staining for NQO1 was detected in all epithelial and endothelial layers, in fibroblasts, in all retinal layers except the photoreceptor outer segments, and in the fascicles and arachnoid of the optic nerve. Only minimal staining was detected in the photoreceptor outer segments and the optic nerve pia and dura. Immunostaining was markedly reduced in all tissues in both eyes from donor 5. Genetic analysis confirmed that this individual was homozygous for a polymorphism in NQO1 (NQO1*2). CONCLUSIONS. NQO1 was detected by immunohistochemistry in every examined section of corneal and conjunctival epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia, suggesting that NQO1 may play a role in the bioactivation of mitomycin C in these tumors. However, the presence of NQO1 in the corneal, conjunctival, and ciliary epithelium; the retinas; and the optic nerves of donor eyes may indicate the potential for mitomycin C toxicity, particularly at higher doses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1617-1622
Number of pages6
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume41
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jun 26 2000

Fingerprint

Mitomycin
Optic Nerve
Neoplasms
Staining and Labeling
Immunohistochemistry
Tissue Donors
NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase (Quinone)
Arachnoid
NAD
Paraffin
Formaldehyde
Retina
Oxidoreductases
Epithelium
Fibroblasts
Monoclonal Antibodies
Pathology
Health
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Immunohistochemical localization of NQO1 in epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia and in donor eyes. / Schelonka, Lee P.; Siegel, David; Wilson, Matthew; Meininger, Alex; Ross, David.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 41, No. 7, 26.06.2000, p. 1617-1622.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schelonka, Lee P. ; Siegel, David ; Wilson, Matthew ; Meininger, Alex ; Ross, David. / Immunohistochemical localization of NQO1 in epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia and in donor eyes. In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 2000 ; Vol. 41, No. 7. pp. 1617-1622.
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abstract = "PURPOSE. To examine the expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1, DT-diaphorase), a potential bioactivating enzyme for mitomycin C in corneal and conjunctival epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia and in normal tissues from human donor eyes, by immunohistochemistry. METHODS. Formalin- fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of human donor eyes and tissue sections with histologic diagnoses of corneal and conjunctival epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia from the Eye Pathology Laboratory, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center were analyzed. Detection of NQO1 in tissues was performed using standard immunohistochemical techniques with monoclonal antibodies against NQO1 and immunoperoxidase staining. RESULTS. All 20 tumors stained positive for NQO1. In seven eyes from four donors, positive staining for NQO1 was detected in all epithelial and endothelial layers, in fibroblasts, in all retinal layers except the photoreceptor outer segments, and in the fascicles and arachnoid of the optic nerve. Only minimal staining was detected in the photoreceptor outer segments and the optic nerve pia and dura. Immunostaining was markedly reduced in all tissues in both eyes from donor 5. Genetic analysis confirmed that this individual was homozygous for a polymorphism in NQO1 (NQO1*2). CONCLUSIONS. NQO1 was detected by immunohistochemistry in every examined section of corneal and conjunctival epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia, suggesting that NQO1 may play a role in the bioactivation of mitomycin C in these tumors. However, the presence of NQO1 in the corneal, conjunctival, and ciliary epithelium; the retinas; and the optic nerves of donor eyes may indicate the potential for mitomycin C toxicity, particularly at higher doses.",
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N2 - PURPOSE. To examine the expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1, DT-diaphorase), a potential bioactivating enzyme for mitomycin C in corneal and conjunctival epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia and in normal tissues from human donor eyes, by immunohistochemistry. METHODS. Formalin- fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of human donor eyes and tissue sections with histologic diagnoses of corneal and conjunctival epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia from the Eye Pathology Laboratory, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center were analyzed. Detection of NQO1 in tissues was performed using standard immunohistochemical techniques with monoclonal antibodies against NQO1 and immunoperoxidase staining. RESULTS. All 20 tumors stained positive for NQO1. In seven eyes from four donors, positive staining for NQO1 was detected in all epithelial and endothelial layers, in fibroblasts, in all retinal layers except the photoreceptor outer segments, and in the fascicles and arachnoid of the optic nerve. Only minimal staining was detected in the photoreceptor outer segments and the optic nerve pia and dura. Immunostaining was markedly reduced in all tissues in both eyes from donor 5. Genetic analysis confirmed that this individual was homozygous for a polymorphism in NQO1 (NQO1*2). CONCLUSIONS. NQO1 was detected by immunohistochemistry in every examined section of corneal and conjunctival epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia, suggesting that NQO1 may play a role in the bioactivation of mitomycin C in these tumors. However, the presence of NQO1 in the corneal, conjunctival, and ciliary epithelium; the retinas; and the optic nerves of donor eyes may indicate the potential for mitomycin C toxicity, particularly at higher doses.

AB - PURPOSE. To examine the expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1, DT-diaphorase), a potential bioactivating enzyme for mitomycin C in corneal and conjunctival epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia and in normal tissues from human donor eyes, by immunohistochemistry. METHODS. Formalin- fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of human donor eyes and tissue sections with histologic diagnoses of corneal and conjunctival epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia from the Eye Pathology Laboratory, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center were analyzed. Detection of NQO1 in tissues was performed using standard immunohistochemical techniques with monoclonal antibodies against NQO1 and immunoperoxidase staining. RESULTS. All 20 tumors stained positive for NQO1. In seven eyes from four donors, positive staining for NQO1 was detected in all epithelial and endothelial layers, in fibroblasts, in all retinal layers except the photoreceptor outer segments, and in the fascicles and arachnoid of the optic nerve. Only minimal staining was detected in the photoreceptor outer segments and the optic nerve pia and dura. Immunostaining was markedly reduced in all tissues in both eyes from donor 5. Genetic analysis confirmed that this individual was homozygous for a polymorphism in NQO1 (NQO1*2). CONCLUSIONS. NQO1 was detected by immunohistochemistry in every examined section of corneal and conjunctival epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia, suggesting that NQO1 may play a role in the bioactivation of mitomycin C in these tumors. However, the presence of NQO1 in the corneal, conjunctival, and ciliary epithelium; the retinas; and the optic nerves of donor eyes may indicate the potential for mitomycin C toxicity, particularly at higher doses.

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