Immunological aspects of autism

A. W. Zimmerman, V. H. Frye, Nicholas Potter

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies of immune system dysfunction suggest that, in some patients, autism may be a neuroimmunological disorder. When one considers these findings along with new neuropathological descriptions in autism, they bear similarities to other postinfectious and neurological immune disorders, such as Sydenham's chorea and the autoimmune component of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The various immunologic abnormalities described in autism mirror its clinical heterogeneity and may eventually explain several common pathways for its pathogenesis. We hypothesize that this may involve an autoimmune attack on excitatory cell systems which are regionally and temporally specific in the developing brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-204
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Pediatrics
Volume8
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Autistic Disorder
Chorea
Immune System Diseases
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Nervous System Diseases
Immune System
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Zimmerman, A. W., Frye, V. H., & Potter, N. (1993). Immunological aspects of autism. International Pediatrics, 8(2), 199-204.

Immunological aspects of autism. / Zimmerman, A. W.; Frye, V. H.; Potter, Nicholas.

In: International Pediatrics, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.01.1993, p. 199-204.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Zimmerman, AW, Frye, VH & Potter, N 1993, 'Immunological aspects of autism', International Pediatrics, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 199-204.
Zimmerman AW, Frye VH, Potter N. Immunological aspects of autism. International Pediatrics. 1993 Jan 1;8(2):199-204.
Zimmerman, A. W. ; Frye, V. H. ; Potter, Nicholas. / Immunological aspects of autism. In: International Pediatrics. 1993 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 199-204.
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