Immunosuppressant side effect profile does not differ between organ transplant types

R. P. Winsett, R. J. Stratta, R. Alloway, Mona Wicks, Donna Hathaway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transplantation has enhanced the quality of life of all transplant recipients, but concern remains regarding the side effects of immunosuppressant drugs. In order to respond to these concerns, a survey to ascertain the side effect profile of transplant recipients was undertaken to identify the impact of chronic immunosuppression on quality of life. A nationwide survey of solid organ transplant recipients was carried out using a newly developed immunosuppressant side effect survey. Kidney, kidney-pancreas, liver and heart recipients responded to the survey (n = 505) and reflect the national distribution based on the UNOS data for organ type, recipient race and gender. The survey had four subscales: emotional burden, life/role responsibilities, mobility and GI distress. A fifth subscale included miscellaneous side effects that are more prevalent during the first 2 years post-transplant. Frequency and severity of each side effect were coded on a scale of 0-4 from 'no problem' to 'always' a problem. The entire range of possible scores (0-160) was reported, reflecting adequate variability in the responses. The sample consisted of 51% males, 77% Caucasians, 15% African Americans, with the remaining 8% other races. There were 225 (44.5%) kidney, 147 (29.1%) liver, 101 (20%) heart and 32 (6.4%) pancreas included. Age ranged from 18-71 years with time since transplant 1-21 years. Overall frequency (12.1 ± 6.08), severity (10.5 ± 6.96) and weighted scores (25.4 ± 19.9) were low suggesting that, as a whole, immunosuppressant side effects, while present, were not severe or troublesome for most patients. Side effect profiles appeared similar among organ types. Differences were detected in the GI distress subscale with the heart recipients reporting significantly less GI distress than liver recipients (13.8 vs. 19.2; P < 0.05). Side effect impact on mobility tended to increase between time eras; however, no statistical significance was detected. Side effects are a concern among health-care professionals; however, based on the results of this study, immunosuppressant-related side effects are not detrimental to quality of life and show no differences between types of organ transplanted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-50
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume15
Issue numberSUPPL. 6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Immunosuppressive Agents
Transplants
Quality of Life
Kidney
Pancreas
Liver
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
African Americans
Immunosuppression
Transplantation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Delivery of Health Care
Transplant Recipients

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Immunosuppressant side effect profile does not differ between organ transplant types. / Winsett, R. P.; Stratta, R. J.; Alloway, R.; Wicks, Mona; Hathaway, Donna.

In: Clinical Transplantation, Vol. 15, No. SUPPL. 6, 2001, p. 46-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Winsett, R. P. ; Stratta, R. J. ; Alloway, R. ; Wicks, Mona ; Hathaway, Donna. / Immunosuppressant side effect profile does not differ between organ transplant types. In: Clinical Transplantation. 2001 ; Vol. 15, No. SUPPL. 6. pp. 46-50.
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