Immunotherapy in Systemic Primary (AL) Amyloidosis Using Amyloid-Reactive Monoclonal Antibodies

Alan Solomon, Deborah T. Weiss, Jonathan Wall

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Heretofore, treatment of patients with primary or light chain-associated (AL) amyloidosis has been directed toward reducing the synthesis of the amyloidogenic precursor protein through conventional or high-dose cytotoxic antiplasma cell chemotherapy. Although such efforts have extended survival, most often the prognosis remains exceedingly poor due to the persistence (or progression) of the pathologic deposits. The development of murine amyloid-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has provided another therapeutic approach; namely, passive immunotherapy. These reagents, prepared against human light chain-related fibrils, recognize an epitope common to the β-pleated structure of AL and other types of amyloid proteins and can effect rapid amyloidolysis when administered to mice injected with human AL amyloid extracts. One such prototypic antibody, the IgG1κ mAb 11-1F4, has now been chimerized and is undergoing GMP production for an eventual phase I and II clinical trial in patients with AL amyloidosis. Demonstration of the therapeutic efficacy of this amyloid-reactive mAb would provide an important proof-of-principle that this form of immunotherapy also could benefit individuals with other types of inherited or acquired amyloid-associated disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)853-860
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Amyloid
Immunotherapy
Monoclonal Antibodies
Amyloidosis
Amyloidogenic Proteins
Light
Phase II Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials, Phase I
Passive Immunization
Epitopes
Therapeutics
Immunoglobulin G
Drug Therapy
Survival
Primary amyloidosis
Antibodies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Pharmacology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Immunotherapy in Systemic Primary (AL) Amyloidosis Using Amyloid-Reactive Monoclonal Antibodies. / Solomon, Alan; Weiss, Deborah T.; Wall, Jonathan.

In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, Vol. 18, No. 6, 01.01.2003, p. 853-860.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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