Impact of a multimedia teaching tool on parental anxiety and knowledge during the informed consent process

Elizabeth A. Paton, Sharon K. Davis, Nan Gaylord, Xueyuan Cao, Ankush Gosain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Before performing a surgical procedure, informed consent (IC) is obtained. Parents may exhibit anxiety and/or a desire for more knowledge during the IC process for their child. The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of a multimedia intervention (MMI) versus conventional discussion on parental understanding and anxiety during the IC process for infants undergoing surgery for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Methods: A time-interrupted series design was employed over a 9-month period. In the first phase, conventional discussion for IC was performed. In the second phase, a MMI was utilized. In both phases, anxiety scores and post-consent knowledge tests were collected. Results: 31 participants were included in the study, 17 in the conventional consent and 14 in the MMI phase. Parental anxiety around the IC discussion was measured. There was a significant decrease in anxiety noted with use of the MMI (p = 0.046) but no significant difference in knowledge (p = 0.84). Conclusion: The MMI significantly reduced parental anxiety during the IC process. Providers may consider applying this type of MMI to other surgical procedures. Securing IC in a manner that improves knowledge and decreases anxiety may improve long-term understanding and parental satisfaction with the health care process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1345-1352
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Surgery International
Volume34
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Fingerprint

Multimedia
Informed Consent
Teaching
Anxiety
Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis
Parents
Delivery of Health Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery

Cite this

Impact of a multimedia teaching tool on parental anxiety and knowledge during the informed consent process. / Paton, Elizabeth A.; Davis, Sharon K.; Gaylord, Nan; Cao, Xueyuan; Gosain, Ankush.

In: Pediatric Surgery International, Vol. 34, No. 12, 01.12.2018, p. 1345-1352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{04aaae4a35794ed8b3b081bbbdf387fe,
title = "Impact of a multimedia teaching tool on parental anxiety and knowledge during the informed consent process",
abstract = "Purpose: Before performing a surgical procedure, informed consent (IC) is obtained. Parents may exhibit anxiety and/or a desire for more knowledge during the IC process for their child. The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of a multimedia intervention (MMI) versus conventional discussion on parental understanding and anxiety during the IC process for infants undergoing surgery for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Methods: A time-interrupted series design was employed over a 9-month period. In the first phase, conventional discussion for IC was performed. In the second phase, a MMI was utilized. In both phases, anxiety scores and post-consent knowledge tests were collected. Results: 31 participants were included in the study, 17 in the conventional consent and 14 in the MMI phase. Parental anxiety around the IC discussion was measured. There was a significant decrease in anxiety noted with use of the MMI (p = 0.046) but no significant difference in knowledge (p = 0.84). Conclusion: The MMI significantly reduced parental anxiety during the IC process. Providers may consider applying this type of MMI to other surgical procedures. Securing IC in a manner that improves knowledge and decreases anxiety may improve long-term understanding and parental satisfaction with the health care process.",
author = "Paton, {Elizabeth A.} and Davis, {Sharon K.} and Nan Gaylord and Xueyuan Cao and Ankush Gosain",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00383-018-4352-z",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "1345--1352",
journal = "Pediatric Surgery International",
issn = "0179-0358",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of a multimedia teaching tool on parental anxiety and knowledge during the informed consent process

AU - Paton, Elizabeth A.

AU - Davis, Sharon K.

AU - Gaylord, Nan

AU - Cao, Xueyuan

AU - Gosain, Ankush

PY - 2018/12/1

Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - Purpose: Before performing a surgical procedure, informed consent (IC) is obtained. Parents may exhibit anxiety and/or a desire for more knowledge during the IC process for their child. The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of a multimedia intervention (MMI) versus conventional discussion on parental understanding and anxiety during the IC process for infants undergoing surgery for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Methods: A time-interrupted series design was employed over a 9-month period. In the first phase, conventional discussion for IC was performed. In the second phase, a MMI was utilized. In both phases, anxiety scores and post-consent knowledge tests were collected. Results: 31 participants were included in the study, 17 in the conventional consent and 14 in the MMI phase. Parental anxiety around the IC discussion was measured. There was a significant decrease in anxiety noted with use of the MMI (p = 0.046) but no significant difference in knowledge (p = 0.84). Conclusion: The MMI significantly reduced parental anxiety during the IC process. Providers may consider applying this type of MMI to other surgical procedures. Securing IC in a manner that improves knowledge and decreases anxiety may improve long-term understanding and parental satisfaction with the health care process.

AB - Purpose: Before performing a surgical procedure, informed consent (IC) is obtained. Parents may exhibit anxiety and/or a desire for more knowledge during the IC process for their child. The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of a multimedia intervention (MMI) versus conventional discussion on parental understanding and anxiety during the IC process for infants undergoing surgery for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Methods: A time-interrupted series design was employed over a 9-month period. In the first phase, conventional discussion for IC was performed. In the second phase, a MMI was utilized. In both phases, anxiety scores and post-consent knowledge tests were collected. Results: 31 participants were included in the study, 17 in the conventional consent and 14 in the MMI phase. Parental anxiety around the IC discussion was measured. There was a significant decrease in anxiety noted with use of the MMI (p = 0.046) but no significant difference in knowledge (p = 0.84). Conclusion: The MMI significantly reduced parental anxiety during the IC process. Providers may consider applying this type of MMI to other surgical procedures. Securing IC in a manner that improves knowledge and decreases anxiety may improve long-term understanding and parental satisfaction with the health care process.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053889082&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053889082&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00383-018-4352-z

DO - 10.1007/s00383-018-4352-z

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 1345

EP - 1352

JO - Pediatric Surgery International

JF - Pediatric Surgery International

SN - 0179-0358

IS - 12

ER -