Impact of a parent-based interdisciplinary intervention for mothers on adjustment in children newly diagnosed with cancer

David A. Fedele, Stephanie E. Hullmann, Mark Chaffin, Carole Kenner, Mark J. Fisher, Katherine Kirk, Angelica Eddington, Sean Phipps, Rene Y. McNall-Knapp, Larry L. Mullins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To determine if maternal distress predicts child adjustment outcomes or if child adjustment outcomes predict maternal distress among children newly diagnosed with cancer, and if a parent-focused intervention has downstream effects on child adjustment. Methods Mothers (n = 52) were randomly assigned to a clinic-based, interdisciplinary intervention for parents of children newly diagnosed with cancer. Measures of maternal distress and child adjustment were collected at baseline, posttreatment, and follow-up. Results A lagged relationship was identified between maternal distress and child internalizing symptoms, but not externalizing symptoms. The parent intervention reduced child internalizing and externalizing symptoms at follow-up. Only the child internalizing symptoms effect was mediated by reduced maternal distress. The child externalizing symptoms effect was mediated by unobserved parent factors. Conclusions This study provides support for illness adjustment and coping models that emphasize the role of parent factors in driving child adjustment outcomes and is encouraging for future parent-focused intervention research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)531-540
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

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Social Adjustment
Mothers
Neoplasms
Parents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Fedele, D. A., Hullmann, S. E., Chaffin, M., Kenner, C., Fisher, M. J., Kirk, K., ... Mullins, L. L. (2013). Impact of a parent-based interdisciplinary intervention for mothers on adjustment in children newly diagnosed with cancer. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 38(5), 531-540. https://doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jst010

Impact of a parent-based interdisciplinary intervention for mothers on adjustment in children newly diagnosed with cancer. / Fedele, David A.; Hullmann, Stephanie E.; Chaffin, Mark; Kenner, Carole; Fisher, Mark J.; Kirk, Katherine; Eddington, Angelica; Phipps, Sean; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y.; Mullins, Larry L.

In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Vol. 38, No. 5, 01.06.2013, p. 531-540.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fedele, DA, Hullmann, SE, Chaffin, M, Kenner, C, Fisher, MJ, Kirk, K, Eddington, A, Phipps, S, McNall-Knapp, RY & Mullins, LL 2013, 'Impact of a parent-based interdisciplinary intervention for mothers on adjustment in children newly diagnosed with cancer', Journal of Pediatric Psychology, vol. 38, no. 5, pp. 531-540. https://doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jst010
Fedele, David A. ; Hullmann, Stephanie E. ; Chaffin, Mark ; Kenner, Carole ; Fisher, Mark J. ; Kirk, Katherine ; Eddington, Angelica ; Phipps, Sean ; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y. ; Mullins, Larry L. / Impact of a parent-based interdisciplinary intervention for mothers on adjustment in children newly diagnosed with cancer. In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 38, No. 5. pp. 531-540.
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