Impact of an education program on late diagnosis of retinoblastoma in Honduras

Christopher Leander, Ligia C. Fu, Armando Peña, Scott Howard, Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo, Judith A. Wilimas, Raul C. Ribeiro, Barrett Haik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. In developed countries, more than 90% of children with retinoblastoma present with limited-stage disease and are cured; however, in countries with limited resources, like Honduras, most patients present with advanced disease and cure rates are less than 50%. Early diagnosis is necessary to improve the survival of children with retinoblastoma in these countries. Procedure. We describe the preliminary results of a retinoblastoma education program linked to a national vaccination campaign in Honduras. Posters and flyers were designed to be accessible to poorly educated readers, to convey the severity of retinoblastoma, and to provide contact information. Charts and an electronic database were reviewed to determine age at diagnosis, presenting signs and symptoms, date of diagnosis, and outcome. Results. During the eight previous years (July 1995-June 2003), 73% of the 59 diagnosed cases of retinoblastoma were extraocular; in contrast, during the post-campaign period (June 2003-January 2005), only 35% of the 23 diagnosed cases showed extraocular spread (P = 0.002). More than one-third of patients in both time periods either refused therapy or abandoned treatment. Conclusion. This inexpensive approach is an effective first step toward improving survival of childhood retinoblastoma. Abandonment and refusal of therapy are continuing obstacles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)817-819
Number of pages3
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Honduras
Retinoblastoma
Delayed Diagnosis
Education
Posters
Immunization Programs
Survival
Developed Countries
Signs and Symptoms
Early Diagnosis
Therapeutics
Databases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cancer Research
  • Hematology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Leander, C., Fu, L. C., Peña, A., Howard, S., Rodriguez-Galindo, C., Wilimas, J. A., ... Haik, B. (2007). Impact of an education program on late diagnosis of retinoblastoma in Honduras. Pediatric Blood and Cancer, 49(6), 817-819. https://doi.org/10.1002/pbc.21052

Impact of an education program on late diagnosis of retinoblastoma in Honduras. / Leander, Christopher; Fu, Ligia C.; Peña, Armando; Howard, Scott; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Wilimas, Judith A.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Haik, Barrett.

In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer, Vol. 49, No. 6, 11.2007, p. 817-819.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leander, C, Fu, LC, Peña, A, Howard, S, Rodriguez-Galindo, C, Wilimas, JA, Ribeiro, RC & Haik, B 2007, 'Impact of an education program on late diagnosis of retinoblastoma in Honduras', Pediatric Blood and Cancer, vol. 49, no. 6, pp. 817-819. https://doi.org/10.1002/pbc.21052
Leander, Christopher ; Fu, Ligia C. ; Peña, Armando ; Howard, Scott ; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos ; Wilimas, Judith A. ; Ribeiro, Raul C. ; Haik, Barrett. / Impact of an education program on late diagnosis of retinoblastoma in Honduras. In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer. 2007 ; Vol. 49, No. 6. pp. 817-819.
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