Impact of antibodies against human leukocyte antigens on long-term outcome in pediatric heart transplant patients

An analysis of the United Network for Organ Sharing database

Joseph W. Rossano, David L.S. Morales, Farhan Zafar, Susan W. Denfield, Jeffrey J. Kim, John Jefferies, William J. Dreyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Controversy exists regarding the importance of circulating antibodies as determined by panel-reactive antibody screening as a risk factor for graft failure in pediatric patients undergoing heart transplantation. This study sought to determine the association of elevated anti-human leukocyte antibodies with long-term survival in pediatric heart transplant patients. Methods: The United Network for Organ Sharing registry was queried for pediatric patients (aged < 18 years at listing) with panel-reactive antibody levels obtained before heart transplantation from 1987 through 2004. Survival analysis methods were used to assess the association of elevated panel-reactive antibodies with long-term graft and patient survival. Results: Panel-reactive antibodies were obtained before transplantation from 3534 patients, median age 4 years (interquartile range 0-12 years). Most, 2711 (77%), had no detectible panel-reactive antibodies, 436 (12%) had panel-reactive antibodies of 1% to 10%, and 387 (11%) had panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10%. Patients with panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10% were more likely to be older (P = .04), have congenital heart disease (P < .001), and have a longer wait list time (P = .006). Patients with panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10% had significantly worse graft survival and patient survival than did patients with undetectable panel-reactive antibodies and panel-reactive antibodies of 1% to 10% (P < .05 for all). Controlling for confounding variables, elevated panel-reactive antibodies as a continuous variable and panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10% as a categorical variable were independently associated with decreased graft survival (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). Conclusions: Elevated panel-reactive antibodies are independently associated with worse long-term graft survival in pediatric patients undergoing heart transplantation. Further study is needed to determine the optimal management of this high-risk population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume140
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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HLA Antigens
Databases
Pediatrics
Transplants
Antibodies
Graft Survival
Heart Transplantation
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Survival
Risk Management
Survival Analysis
Registries
Heart Diseases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Impact of antibodies against human leukocyte antigens on long-term outcome in pediatric heart transplant patients : An analysis of the United Network for Organ Sharing database. / Rossano, Joseph W.; Morales, David L.S.; Zafar, Farhan; Denfield, Susan W.; Kim, Jeffrey J.; Jefferies, John; Dreyer, William J.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 140, No. 3, 01.01.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Impact of antibodies against human leukocyte antigens on long-term outcome in pediatric heart transplant patients: An analysis of the United Network for Organ Sharing database",
abstract = "Objectives: Controversy exists regarding the importance of circulating antibodies as determined by panel-reactive antibody screening as a risk factor for graft failure in pediatric patients undergoing heart transplantation. This study sought to determine the association of elevated anti-human leukocyte antibodies with long-term survival in pediatric heart transplant patients. Methods: The United Network for Organ Sharing registry was queried for pediatric patients (aged < 18 years at listing) with panel-reactive antibody levels obtained before heart transplantation from 1987 through 2004. Survival analysis methods were used to assess the association of elevated panel-reactive antibodies with long-term graft and patient survival. Results: Panel-reactive antibodies were obtained before transplantation from 3534 patients, median age 4 years (interquartile range 0-12 years). Most, 2711 (77{\%}), had no detectible panel-reactive antibodies, 436 (12{\%}) had panel-reactive antibodies of 1{\%} to 10{\%}, and 387 (11{\%}) had panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10{\%}. Patients with panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10{\%} were more likely to be older (P = .04), have congenital heart disease (P < .001), and have a longer wait list time (P = .006). Patients with panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10{\%} had significantly worse graft survival and patient survival than did patients with undetectable panel-reactive antibodies and panel-reactive antibodies of 1{\%} to 10{\%} (P < .05 for all). Controlling for confounding variables, elevated panel-reactive antibodies as a continuous variable and panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10{\%} as a categorical variable were independently associated with decreased graft survival (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). Conclusions: Elevated panel-reactive antibodies are independently associated with worse long-term graft survival in pediatric patients undergoing heart transplantation. Further study is needed to determine the optimal management of this high-risk population.",
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T2 - An analysis of the United Network for Organ Sharing database

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AU - Morales, David L.S.

AU - Zafar, Farhan

AU - Denfield, Susan W.

AU - Kim, Jeffrey J.

AU - Jefferies, John

AU - Dreyer, William J.

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N2 - Objectives: Controversy exists regarding the importance of circulating antibodies as determined by panel-reactive antibody screening as a risk factor for graft failure in pediatric patients undergoing heart transplantation. This study sought to determine the association of elevated anti-human leukocyte antibodies with long-term survival in pediatric heart transplant patients. Methods: The United Network for Organ Sharing registry was queried for pediatric patients (aged < 18 years at listing) with panel-reactive antibody levels obtained before heart transplantation from 1987 through 2004. Survival analysis methods were used to assess the association of elevated panel-reactive antibodies with long-term graft and patient survival. Results: Panel-reactive antibodies were obtained before transplantation from 3534 patients, median age 4 years (interquartile range 0-12 years). Most, 2711 (77%), had no detectible panel-reactive antibodies, 436 (12%) had panel-reactive antibodies of 1% to 10%, and 387 (11%) had panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10%. Patients with panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10% were more likely to be older (P = .04), have congenital heart disease (P < .001), and have a longer wait list time (P = .006). Patients with panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10% had significantly worse graft survival and patient survival than did patients with undetectable panel-reactive antibodies and panel-reactive antibodies of 1% to 10% (P < .05 for all). Controlling for confounding variables, elevated panel-reactive antibodies as a continuous variable and panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10% as a categorical variable were independently associated with decreased graft survival (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). Conclusions: Elevated panel-reactive antibodies are independently associated with worse long-term graft survival in pediatric patients undergoing heart transplantation. Further study is needed to determine the optimal management of this high-risk population.

AB - Objectives: Controversy exists regarding the importance of circulating antibodies as determined by panel-reactive antibody screening as a risk factor for graft failure in pediatric patients undergoing heart transplantation. This study sought to determine the association of elevated anti-human leukocyte antibodies with long-term survival in pediatric heart transplant patients. Methods: The United Network for Organ Sharing registry was queried for pediatric patients (aged < 18 years at listing) with panel-reactive antibody levels obtained before heart transplantation from 1987 through 2004. Survival analysis methods were used to assess the association of elevated panel-reactive antibodies with long-term graft and patient survival. Results: Panel-reactive antibodies were obtained before transplantation from 3534 patients, median age 4 years (interquartile range 0-12 years). Most, 2711 (77%), had no detectible panel-reactive antibodies, 436 (12%) had panel-reactive antibodies of 1% to 10%, and 387 (11%) had panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10%. Patients with panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10% were more likely to be older (P = .04), have congenital heart disease (P < .001), and have a longer wait list time (P = .006). Patients with panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10% had significantly worse graft survival and patient survival than did patients with undetectable panel-reactive antibodies and panel-reactive antibodies of 1% to 10% (P < .05 for all). Controlling for confounding variables, elevated panel-reactive antibodies as a continuous variable and panel-reactive antibodies greater than 10% as a categorical variable were independently associated with decreased graft survival (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). Conclusions: Elevated panel-reactive antibodies are independently associated with worse long-term graft survival in pediatric patients undergoing heart transplantation. Further study is needed to determine the optimal management of this high-risk population.

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