Impact of beta-blockers on nonhead injured trauma patients

Leah E. Hendrick, Thomas J. Schroeppel, John P. Sharpe, Diana Alsbrook, Louis J. Magnotti, Jordan A. Weinberg, Benjamin P. Johnson, Richard H. Lewis, L. Paige Clement, Martin Croce, Timothy C. Fabian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Catecholamine surge after traumatic injury may lead to dysautonomia with increased morbidity. Small retrospective studies have shown potential benefit of beta-blockers (BB) in trauma patients with and without traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study evaluates a large multiply injured cohort without TBI that received BB. Patientswere identified fromthe trauma registry fromJanuary 1, 2003 to December 31, 2011. Patients who received >1 dose of BB were compared to controls. Patients with TBI, length of stay (LOS) < 2 days, and prehospital BB were excluded. Outcomes were mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) LOS, and LOS. Stepwise multivariable regression was used to identify variables significantly associated with mortality. During the study period, 19,151 eligible patients were admitted. The mean age was 39 years. Most were male (74%) and most sustained blunt mechanism (75%). A total of 1854 (11%) patients received BB. BB patients had longer LOS (16 vs 6 days), ICU LOS (7 vs 1 days), and higher mortality (2.8 vs 0.5%) (all P < 0.001). Multivariable regression demonstrated no benefit to BB after adjusting for potential confounding characteristics [odds ratio (OR) 0.952; confidence interval (CI) 0.620-1.461]. In conclusion, in this largest study to date, patients receiving BB were older, more severely injured, and had a higher mortality. Unlike TBI patients, multivariable regression showed no benefit from BB in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)575-579
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume82
Issue number7
StatePublished - 2016

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Wounds and Injuries
Length of Stay
Mortality
Intensive Care Units
Primary Dysautonomias
Catecholamines
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Morbidity
Traumatic Brain Injury
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hendrick, L. E., Schroeppel, T. J., Sharpe, J. P., Alsbrook, D., Magnotti, L. J., Weinberg, J. A., ... Fabian, T. C. (2016). Impact of beta-blockers on nonhead injured trauma patients. American Surgeon, 82(7), 575-579.

Impact of beta-blockers on nonhead injured trauma patients. / Hendrick, Leah E.; Schroeppel, Thomas J.; Sharpe, John P.; Alsbrook, Diana; Magnotti, Louis J.; Weinberg, Jordan A.; Johnson, Benjamin P.; Lewis, Richard H.; Clement, L. Paige; Croce, Martin; Fabian, Timothy C.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 82, No. 7, 2016, p. 575-579.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hendrick, LE, Schroeppel, TJ, Sharpe, JP, Alsbrook, D, Magnotti, LJ, Weinberg, JA, Johnson, BP, Lewis, RH, Clement, LP, Croce, M & Fabian, TC 2016, 'Impact of beta-blockers on nonhead injured trauma patients', American Surgeon, vol. 82, no. 7, pp. 575-579.
Hendrick LE, Schroeppel TJ, Sharpe JP, Alsbrook D, Magnotti LJ, Weinberg JA et al. Impact of beta-blockers on nonhead injured trauma patients. American Surgeon. 2016;82(7):575-579.
Hendrick, Leah E. ; Schroeppel, Thomas J. ; Sharpe, John P. ; Alsbrook, Diana ; Magnotti, Louis J. ; Weinberg, Jordan A. ; Johnson, Benjamin P. ; Lewis, Richard H. ; Clement, L. Paige ; Croce, Martin ; Fabian, Timothy C. / Impact of beta-blockers on nonhead injured trauma patients. In: American Surgeon. 2016 ; Vol. 82, No. 7. pp. 575-579.
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