Impaired wound healing predisposes obese mice to severe influenza virus infection

Kevin B. O'Brien, Peter Vogel, Susu Duan, Elena A. Govorkova, Richard J. Webby, Jonathan Mccullers, Stacey Schultz-Cherry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For the first time, obesity appeared as a risk factor for developing severe 2009 pandemic influenza infection. Given the increase in obesity, there is a need to understand the mechanisms underlying poor outcomes in this population. In these studies, we examined the severity of pandemic influenza virus in obese mice and evaluated antiviral effectiveness. We found that genetically and diet-induced obese mice challenged with either 2009 influenza A virus subtype H1N1 or 1968 subtype H3N2 strains were more likely to have increased mortality and lung pathology associated with impaired wound repair and subsequent pulmonary edema. Antiviral treatment with oseltamivir enhanced survival of obese mice. Overall, these studies demonstrate that impaired wound lung repair in the lungs of obese animals may result in severe influenza virus infection. Alternative approaches to prevention and control of influenza may be needed in the setting of obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)252-261
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume205
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Obese Mice
Virus Diseases
Orthomyxoviridae
Wound Healing
Obesity
Pandemics
Lung
Human Influenza
Antiviral Agents
Oseltamivir
H1N1 Subtype Influenza A Virus
Wounds and Injuries
Pulmonary Edema
Pathology
Diet
Mortality
Infection
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

O'Brien, K. B., Vogel, P., Duan, S., Govorkova, E. A., Webby, R. J., Mccullers, J., & Schultz-Cherry, S. (2012). Impaired wound healing predisposes obese mice to severe influenza virus infection. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 205(2), 252-261. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jir729

Impaired wound healing predisposes obese mice to severe influenza virus infection. / O'Brien, Kevin B.; Vogel, Peter; Duan, Susu; Govorkova, Elena A.; Webby, Richard J.; Mccullers, Jonathan; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 205, No. 2, 15.01.2012, p. 252-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Brien, KB, Vogel, P, Duan, S, Govorkova, EA, Webby, RJ, Mccullers, J & Schultz-Cherry, S 2012, 'Impaired wound healing predisposes obese mice to severe influenza virus infection', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 205, no. 2, pp. 252-261. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jir729
O'Brien, Kevin B. ; Vogel, Peter ; Duan, Susu ; Govorkova, Elena A. ; Webby, Richard J. ; Mccullers, Jonathan ; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey. / Impaired wound healing predisposes obese mice to severe influenza virus infection. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2012 ; Vol. 205, No. 2. pp. 252-261.
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