Implementation of pharmaceutical care in acute medical cardiovascular patients

Marie Chisholm-Burns, D. G. Pittman, J. M. Longley, S. R. Mullis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

All inpatients who were admitted to one designated cardiologist at a private community hospital were followed by a pharmacist. The pharmacist prospectively evaluated the patients' medications in order to identify, resolve, and prevent any meditation related problems. Recommendations concerning these medication related problems were made to the physician involved. In addition, the pharmacist documented medication information questions, medication dosing consultations, and patient medication counseling consults. Ninety-seven percent of the recommendations were accepted by the prescriber. The most common categories of recommendations were for drugs belonging to cardiovascular (40.3%) and anti-infective (18.4%) classes. Improper medication selection (19.6%), untreated indication (17.4%), overdosage (16.3%), and meditation given without an indication (13%) were the most common medication related problems and accounted for over two-thirds of the total accepted recommendations. Sixty-six percent of the recommendations were considered significant and 4% were considered extremely significant. Based on the pharmacist's interventions, an annual patient medication charge savings of $17,576.00 was estimated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)572-574+577
JournalHospital Pharmacy
Volume30
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pharmaceutical Services
Pharmacists
Meditation
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Private Hospitals
Community Hospital
Counseling
Inpatients
Referral and Consultation
Physicians

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Chisholm-Burns, M., Pittman, D. G., Longley, J. M., & Mullis, S. R. (1995). Implementation of pharmaceutical care in acute medical cardiovascular patients. Hospital Pharmacy, 30(7), 572-574+577.

Implementation of pharmaceutical care in acute medical cardiovascular patients. / Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Pittman, D. G.; Longley, J. M.; Mullis, S. R.

In: Hospital Pharmacy, Vol. 30, No. 7, 01.01.1995, p. 572-574+577.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chisholm-Burns, M, Pittman, DG, Longley, JM & Mullis, SR 1995, 'Implementation of pharmaceutical care in acute medical cardiovascular patients', Hospital Pharmacy, vol. 30, no. 7, pp. 572-574+577.
Chisholm-Burns, Marie ; Pittman, D. G. ; Longley, J. M. ; Mullis, S. R. / Implementation of pharmaceutical care in acute medical cardiovascular patients. In: Hospital Pharmacy. 1995 ; Vol. 30, No. 7. pp. 572-574+577.
@article{28166c232de944d98e0599e0fe45370c,
title = "Implementation of pharmaceutical care in acute medical cardiovascular patients",
abstract = "All inpatients who were admitted to one designated cardiologist at a private community hospital were followed by a pharmacist. The pharmacist prospectively evaluated the patients' medications in order to identify, resolve, and prevent any meditation related problems. Recommendations concerning these medication related problems were made to the physician involved. In addition, the pharmacist documented medication information questions, medication dosing consultations, and patient medication counseling consults. Ninety-seven percent of the recommendations were accepted by the prescriber. The most common categories of recommendations were for drugs belonging to cardiovascular (40.3{\%}) and anti-infective (18.4{\%}) classes. Improper medication selection (19.6{\%}), untreated indication (17.4{\%}), overdosage (16.3{\%}), and meditation given without an indication (13{\%}) were the most common medication related problems and accounted for over two-thirds of the total accepted recommendations. Sixty-six percent of the recommendations were considered significant and 4{\%} were considered extremely significant. Based on the pharmacist's interventions, an annual patient medication charge savings of $17,576.00 was estimated.",
author = "Marie Chisholm-Burns and Pittman, {D. G.} and Longley, {J. M.} and Mullis, {S. R.}",
year = "1995",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "572--574+577",
journal = "Hospital Pharmacy",
issn = "0018-5787",
publisher = "Facts and Comparisons",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Implementation of pharmaceutical care in acute medical cardiovascular patients

AU - Chisholm-Burns, Marie

AU - Pittman, D. G.

AU - Longley, J. M.

AU - Mullis, S. R.

PY - 1995/1/1

Y1 - 1995/1/1

N2 - All inpatients who were admitted to one designated cardiologist at a private community hospital were followed by a pharmacist. The pharmacist prospectively evaluated the patients' medications in order to identify, resolve, and prevent any meditation related problems. Recommendations concerning these medication related problems were made to the physician involved. In addition, the pharmacist documented medication information questions, medication dosing consultations, and patient medication counseling consults. Ninety-seven percent of the recommendations were accepted by the prescriber. The most common categories of recommendations were for drugs belonging to cardiovascular (40.3%) and anti-infective (18.4%) classes. Improper medication selection (19.6%), untreated indication (17.4%), overdosage (16.3%), and meditation given without an indication (13%) were the most common medication related problems and accounted for over two-thirds of the total accepted recommendations. Sixty-six percent of the recommendations were considered significant and 4% were considered extremely significant. Based on the pharmacist's interventions, an annual patient medication charge savings of $17,576.00 was estimated.

AB - All inpatients who were admitted to one designated cardiologist at a private community hospital were followed by a pharmacist. The pharmacist prospectively evaluated the patients' medications in order to identify, resolve, and prevent any meditation related problems. Recommendations concerning these medication related problems were made to the physician involved. In addition, the pharmacist documented medication information questions, medication dosing consultations, and patient medication counseling consults. Ninety-seven percent of the recommendations were accepted by the prescriber. The most common categories of recommendations were for drugs belonging to cardiovascular (40.3%) and anti-infective (18.4%) classes. Improper medication selection (19.6%), untreated indication (17.4%), overdosage (16.3%), and meditation given without an indication (13%) were the most common medication related problems and accounted for over two-thirds of the total accepted recommendations. Sixty-six percent of the recommendations were considered significant and 4% were considered extremely significant. Based on the pharmacist's interventions, an annual patient medication charge savings of $17,576.00 was estimated.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029095264&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029095264&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 572-574+577

JO - Hospital Pharmacy

JF - Hospital Pharmacy

SN - 0018-5787

IS - 7

ER -