Implications of the Landauer limit for quantum logic

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The design of any system of quantum logic must take into account the implications of the Landauer limit for logical bits. Useful computation implies a deterministic outcome, and so any system of quantum computation must produce a final deterministic outcome, which in a quantum computer requires a quantum decision that produces a deterministic qubit. All information is physical, and any bit of information can be considered to exist in a physicality represented as a decision between the two wells of a double well potential in which the energy barrier between the two wells must be greater than kT·ln2. Any proposed system of quantum computation that does not result in such a deterministic outcome can only be considered stochastically as a probability distribution (i.e. a wave function). An example of such determinism in a quantum logic system is theorized to exist in the DNA molecule, where the decoherence of quantum decision results in an enantiomeric shift in the deoxyribose moiety that is appropriate to the Landauer limit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationQuantum Information and Computation XII
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Print)9781628410600
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
EventQuantum Information and Computation XII - Baltimore, MD, United States
Duration: May 8 2014May 9 2014

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume9123
ISSN (Print)0277-786X
ISSN (Electronic)1996-756X

Other

OtherQuantum Information and Computation XII
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore, MD
Period5/8/145/9/14

Fingerprint

Quantum Logic
Quantum computers
logic
quantum computation
Quantum Computation
Deoxyribose
quantum computers
Energy barriers
Wave functions
Double-well Potential
Quantum Computer
Probability distributions
Determinism
Decoherence
DNA
deoxyribonucleic acid
Qubit
wave functions
Wave Function
Molecules

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Mihelic, F. (2014). Implications of the Landauer limit for quantum logic. In Quantum Information and Computation XII [91230B] (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 9123). SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2048531

Implications of the Landauer limit for quantum logic. / Mihelic, Fabian.

Quantum Information and Computation XII. SPIE, 2014. 91230B (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 9123).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mihelic, F 2014, Implications of the Landauer limit for quantum logic. in Quantum Information and Computation XII., 91230B, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 9123, SPIE, Quantum Information and Computation XII, Baltimore, MD, United States, 5/8/14. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2048531
Mihelic F. Implications of the Landauer limit for quantum logic. In Quantum Information and Computation XII. SPIE. 2014. 91230B. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2048531
Mihelic, Fabian. / Implications of the Landauer limit for quantum logic. Quantum Information and Computation XII. SPIE, 2014. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering).
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