Improving the spatial alignment in PET/CT using amplitude-based respiration-gated PET and respiration-triggered CT

Charlotte S. Van Der Vos, Willem Grootjans, Dustin Osborne, Antoi P.W. Meeuwis, James J. Hamill, Shelley Acuff, Lioe Fee De Geus-Oei, Eric P. Visser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Respiratory motion during PET can cause inaccuracies in the quantification of radiotracer uptake, which negatively affects PETguided radiotherapy planning. Quantitative accuracy can be improved by respiratory gating. However, additional miscalculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) in PET images can be caused by inappropriate attenuation correction due to a spatial mismatch between gated PET and CT. In this study, the effect of respirationtriggered CT on the spatial match between CT and amplitude-based respiration-gated PET images is investigated. Methods: 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed in 38 patients. Images were acquired on 2 PET/CT scanners, one without and one with continuous bed motion during PET acquisition. The amplitude limits of the amplitude-based respiration-gated PET were used for the respiration-triggered sequential low-dose CT. Both standard (spiral) and triggered CT scans were used to reconstruct the PET data. Spatial mismatch was quantified using the position difference between the lung-liver boundary in PET and CT images, the distance between PET and CT lung lesions' centroids, and the amount of overlap of lesions indicated by the Jaccard similarity coefficient. Furthermore, the effect of attenuation correction was quantified by measuring SUVs in lung lesions. Results: For triggered CT, the average distance between the lung-liver boundary in PET and CT was significantly reduced (4.5 ± 6.7 mm) when compared with standard CT (9.2 ± 8.1 mm) (P, 0.001). The mean distance between the lesions' centroids in PET and CT images was 6.3 ± 4.0 and 5.6 ± 4.2 mm (P 5 0.424), for the standard and triggered CT, respectively. Similarly, the Jaccard similarity coefficient was 0.30 ± 0.21 and 0.32 ± 0.20 (P 5 0.609) for standard and triggered CT, respectively. For 6 lesions, there was no overlap of PET and CT when the standard CT was used; compared with the triggered CT, these lesions showed (partial) overlap. The maximum and mean SUV increase of the PET/CT compared with the PET/triggered CT was 5.7% ± 11.2% (P, 0.001) and 6.1% ± 10.2% (P 5 0.001), respectively. Conclusion: Amplitude-based respiration-gated PET in combination with respiration-triggered CT resulted in a significantly improved match in the area of the liver dome and a significantly higher SUV for lung lesions. However, lesions in the lungs did not show a consistent improvement in spatial match.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1817-1822
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume56
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Respiration
Lung
Liver
Spiral Computed Tomography
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Radiotherapy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Improving the spatial alignment in PET/CT using amplitude-based respiration-gated PET and respiration-triggered CT. / Van Der Vos, Charlotte S.; Grootjans, Willem; Osborne, Dustin; Meeuwis, Antoi P.W.; Hamill, James J.; Acuff, Shelley; De Geus-Oei, Lioe Fee; Visser, Eric P.

In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Vol. 56, No. 12, 01.12.2015, p. 1817-1822.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Van Der Vos, CS, Grootjans, W, Osborne, D, Meeuwis, APW, Hamill, JJ, Acuff, S, De Geus-Oei, LF & Visser, EP 2015, 'Improving the spatial alignment in PET/CT using amplitude-based respiration-gated PET and respiration-triggered CT', Journal of Nuclear Medicine, vol. 56, no. 12, pp. 1817-1822. https://doi.org/10.2967/jnumed.115.163055
Van Der Vos, Charlotte S. ; Grootjans, Willem ; Osborne, Dustin ; Meeuwis, Antoi P.W. ; Hamill, James J. ; Acuff, Shelley ; De Geus-Oei, Lioe Fee ; Visser, Eric P. / Improving the spatial alignment in PET/CT using amplitude-based respiration-gated PET and respiration-triggered CT. In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 56, No. 12. pp. 1817-1822.
@article{45163f9190c14850b9338c79657960fb,
title = "Improving the spatial alignment in PET/CT using amplitude-based respiration-gated PET and respiration-triggered CT",
abstract = "Respiratory motion during PET can cause inaccuracies in the quantification of radiotracer uptake, which negatively affects PETguided radiotherapy planning. Quantitative accuracy can be improved by respiratory gating. However, additional miscalculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) in PET images can be caused by inappropriate attenuation correction due to a spatial mismatch between gated PET and CT. In this study, the effect of respirationtriggered CT on the spatial match between CT and amplitude-based respiration-gated PET images is investigated. Methods: 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed in 38 patients. Images were acquired on 2 PET/CT scanners, one without and one with continuous bed motion during PET acquisition. The amplitude limits of the amplitude-based respiration-gated PET were used for the respiration-triggered sequential low-dose CT. Both standard (spiral) and triggered CT scans were used to reconstruct the PET data. Spatial mismatch was quantified using the position difference between the lung-liver boundary in PET and CT images, the distance between PET and CT lung lesions' centroids, and the amount of overlap of lesions indicated by the Jaccard similarity coefficient. Furthermore, the effect of attenuation correction was quantified by measuring SUVs in lung lesions. Results: For triggered CT, the average distance between the lung-liver boundary in PET and CT was significantly reduced (4.5 ± 6.7 mm) when compared with standard CT (9.2 ± 8.1 mm) (P, 0.001). The mean distance between the lesions' centroids in PET and CT images was 6.3 ± 4.0 and 5.6 ± 4.2 mm (P 5 0.424), for the standard and triggered CT, respectively. Similarly, the Jaccard similarity coefficient was 0.30 ± 0.21 and 0.32 ± 0.20 (P 5 0.609) for standard and triggered CT, respectively. For 6 lesions, there was no overlap of PET and CT when the standard CT was used; compared with the triggered CT, these lesions showed (partial) overlap. The maximum and mean SUV increase of the PET/CT compared with the PET/triggered CT was 5.7{\%} ± 11.2{\%} (P, 0.001) and 6.1{\%} ± 10.2{\%} (P 5 0.001), respectively. Conclusion: Amplitude-based respiration-gated PET in combination with respiration-triggered CT resulted in a significantly improved match in the area of the liver dome and a significantly higher SUV for lung lesions. However, lesions in the lungs did not show a consistent improvement in spatial match.",
author = "{Van Der Vos}, {Charlotte S.} and Willem Grootjans and Dustin Osborne and Meeuwis, {Antoi P.W.} and Hamill, {James J.} and Shelley Acuff and {De Geus-Oei}, {Lioe Fee} and Visser, {Eric P.}",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2967/jnumed.115.163055",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "56",
pages = "1817--1822",
journal = "Journal of Nuclear Medicine",
issn = "0161-5505",
publisher = "Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Improving the spatial alignment in PET/CT using amplitude-based respiration-gated PET and respiration-triggered CT

AU - Van Der Vos, Charlotte S.

AU - Grootjans, Willem

AU - Osborne, Dustin

AU - Meeuwis, Antoi P.W.

AU - Hamill, James J.

AU - Acuff, Shelley

AU - De Geus-Oei, Lioe Fee

AU - Visser, Eric P.

PY - 2015/12/1

Y1 - 2015/12/1

N2 - Respiratory motion during PET can cause inaccuracies in the quantification of radiotracer uptake, which negatively affects PETguided radiotherapy planning. Quantitative accuracy can be improved by respiratory gating. However, additional miscalculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) in PET images can be caused by inappropriate attenuation correction due to a spatial mismatch between gated PET and CT. In this study, the effect of respirationtriggered CT on the spatial match between CT and amplitude-based respiration-gated PET images is investigated. Methods: 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed in 38 patients. Images were acquired on 2 PET/CT scanners, one without and one with continuous bed motion during PET acquisition. The amplitude limits of the amplitude-based respiration-gated PET were used for the respiration-triggered sequential low-dose CT. Both standard (spiral) and triggered CT scans were used to reconstruct the PET data. Spatial mismatch was quantified using the position difference between the lung-liver boundary in PET and CT images, the distance between PET and CT lung lesions' centroids, and the amount of overlap of lesions indicated by the Jaccard similarity coefficient. Furthermore, the effect of attenuation correction was quantified by measuring SUVs in lung lesions. Results: For triggered CT, the average distance between the lung-liver boundary in PET and CT was significantly reduced (4.5 ± 6.7 mm) when compared with standard CT (9.2 ± 8.1 mm) (P, 0.001). The mean distance between the lesions' centroids in PET and CT images was 6.3 ± 4.0 and 5.6 ± 4.2 mm (P 5 0.424), for the standard and triggered CT, respectively. Similarly, the Jaccard similarity coefficient was 0.30 ± 0.21 and 0.32 ± 0.20 (P 5 0.609) for standard and triggered CT, respectively. For 6 lesions, there was no overlap of PET and CT when the standard CT was used; compared with the triggered CT, these lesions showed (partial) overlap. The maximum and mean SUV increase of the PET/CT compared with the PET/triggered CT was 5.7% ± 11.2% (P, 0.001) and 6.1% ± 10.2% (P 5 0.001), respectively. Conclusion: Amplitude-based respiration-gated PET in combination with respiration-triggered CT resulted in a significantly improved match in the area of the liver dome and a significantly higher SUV for lung lesions. However, lesions in the lungs did not show a consistent improvement in spatial match.

AB - Respiratory motion during PET can cause inaccuracies in the quantification of radiotracer uptake, which negatively affects PETguided radiotherapy planning. Quantitative accuracy can be improved by respiratory gating. However, additional miscalculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) in PET images can be caused by inappropriate attenuation correction due to a spatial mismatch between gated PET and CT. In this study, the effect of respirationtriggered CT on the spatial match between CT and amplitude-based respiration-gated PET images is investigated. Methods: 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed in 38 patients. Images were acquired on 2 PET/CT scanners, one without and one with continuous bed motion during PET acquisition. The amplitude limits of the amplitude-based respiration-gated PET were used for the respiration-triggered sequential low-dose CT. Both standard (spiral) and triggered CT scans were used to reconstruct the PET data. Spatial mismatch was quantified using the position difference between the lung-liver boundary in PET and CT images, the distance between PET and CT lung lesions' centroids, and the amount of overlap of lesions indicated by the Jaccard similarity coefficient. Furthermore, the effect of attenuation correction was quantified by measuring SUVs in lung lesions. Results: For triggered CT, the average distance between the lung-liver boundary in PET and CT was significantly reduced (4.5 ± 6.7 mm) when compared with standard CT (9.2 ± 8.1 mm) (P, 0.001). The mean distance between the lesions' centroids in PET and CT images was 6.3 ± 4.0 and 5.6 ± 4.2 mm (P 5 0.424), for the standard and triggered CT, respectively. Similarly, the Jaccard similarity coefficient was 0.30 ± 0.21 and 0.32 ± 0.20 (P 5 0.609) for standard and triggered CT, respectively. For 6 lesions, there was no overlap of PET and CT when the standard CT was used; compared with the triggered CT, these lesions showed (partial) overlap. The maximum and mean SUV increase of the PET/CT compared with the PET/triggered CT was 5.7% ± 11.2% (P, 0.001) and 6.1% ± 10.2% (P 5 0.001), respectively. Conclusion: Amplitude-based respiration-gated PET in combination with respiration-triggered CT resulted in a significantly improved match in the area of the liver dome and a significantly higher SUV for lung lesions. However, lesions in the lungs did not show a consistent improvement in spatial match.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84958260270&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84958260270&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2967/jnumed.115.163055

DO - 10.2967/jnumed.115.163055

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 1817

EP - 1822

JO - Journal of Nuclear Medicine

JF - Journal of Nuclear Medicine

SN - 0161-5505

IS - 12

ER -