In-home toxic chemical exposures and children with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Joyce Graff, Laura Murphy, Shirley Ekvall, Michele Gagnon

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the focus on preventing toxic chemical exposures during pregnancy, the perinatal period, and childhood, health professionals have given little attention to the risks and effects of toxic chemical exposures on children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (DD). Children with DD may be at higher risk due to behaviors that persist past a developmentally appropriate age, communication skills, motor skills, nutrition issues, and health problems related to DD. This article examines exposure of children to lead, mercury, and environmental tobacco smoke, three toxicants known to affect children's health and development. The authors identify sources of these toxicants, examine research documenting their effects on children, consider strategies to prevent and manage exposure, identify characteristics and behaviors placing children with DD at increased risk of exposure, and discuss implications for health providers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)596-603
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric nursing
Volume32
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

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Developmental Disabilities
Poisons
Disabled Children
Intellectual Disability
Health
Motor Skills
Child Development
Mercury
Smoke
Tobacco
Communication
Pregnancy
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics

Cite this

In-home toxic chemical exposures and children with intellectual and developmental disabilities. / Graff, Joyce; Murphy, Laura; Ekvall, Shirley; Gagnon, Michele.

In: Pediatric nursing, Vol. 32, No. 6, 01.11.2006, p. 596-603.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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