In utero exposure to fine particulate matter results in an altered neuroimmune phenotype in adult mice

Joshua A. Kulas, Jordan V. Hettwer, Mona Sohrabi, Justine E. Melvin, Gunjan D. Manocha, Kendra L. Puig, Matthew W. Gorr, Vineeta Tanwar, Michael Mcdonald, Loren E. Wold, Colin K. Combs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Environmental exposure to air pollution has been linked to a number of health problems including organ rejection, lung damage and inflammation. While the deleterious effects of air pollution in adult animals are well documented, the long-term consequences of particulate matter (PM) exposure during animal development are uncertain. In this study we tested the hypothesis that environmental exposure to PM 2.5 μm in diameter in utero promotes long term inflammation and neurodegeneration. We evaluated the behavior of PM exposed animals using several tests and observed deficits in spatial memory without robust changes in anxiety-like behavior. We then examined how this affects the brains of adult animals by examining proteins implicated in neurodegeneration, synapse formation and inflammation by western blot, ELISA and immunohistochemistry. These tests revealed significantly increased levels of COX2 protein in PM2.5 exposed animal brains in addition to changes in synaptophysin and Arg1 proteins. Exposure to PM2.5 also increased the immunoreactivity for GFAP, a marker of activated astrocytes. Cytokine concentrations in the brain and spleen were also altered by PM2.5 exposure. These findings indicate that in utero exposure to particulate matter has long term consequences which may affect the development of both the brain and the immune system in addition to promoting inflammatory change in adult animals. Our data indicate that in utero exposure to particulate matter has long term consequences in the adult brain including behavioral alterations, increased COX2 expression and broad changes in cytokine levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-288
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume241
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Fingerprint

Particulate Matter
Animals
Brain
Phenotype
Air Pollution
Environmental Exposure
Proteins
Air pollution
Cytokines
Inflammation
Synaptophysin
Immune system
Medical problems
Astrocytes
Synapses
Immune System
Pneumonia
Spleen
Anxiety
Western Blotting

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Kulas, J. A., Hettwer, J. V., Sohrabi, M., Melvin, J. E., Manocha, G. D., Puig, K. L., ... Combs, C. K. (2018). In utero exposure to fine particulate matter results in an altered neuroimmune phenotype in adult mice. Environmental Pollution, 241, 279-288. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2018.05.047

In utero exposure to fine particulate matter results in an altered neuroimmune phenotype in adult mice. / Kulas, Joshua A.; Hettwer, Jordan V.; Sohrabi, Mona; Melvin, Justine E.; Manocha, Gunjan D.; Puig, Kendra L.; Gorr, Matthew W.; Tanwar, Vineeta; Mcdonald, Michael; Wold, Loren E.; Combs, Colin K.

In: Environmental Pollution, Vol. 241, 01.10.2018, p. 279-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kulas, JA, Hettwer, JV, Sohrabi, M, Melvin, JE, Manocha, GD, Puig, KL, Gorr, MW, Tanwar, V, Mcdonald, M, Wold, LE & Combs, CK 2018, 'In utero exposure to fine particulate matter results in an altered neuroimmune phenotype in adult mice', Environmental Pollution, vol. 241, pp. 279-288. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2018.05.047
Kulas, Joshua A. ; Hettwer, Jordan V. ; Sohrabi, Mona ; Melvin, Justine E. ; Manocha, Gunjan D. ; Puig, Kendra L. ; Gorr, Matthew W. ; Tanwar, Vineeta ; Mcdonald, Michael ; Wold, Loren E. ; Combs, Colin K. / In utero exposure to fine particulate matter results in an altered neuroimmune phenotype in adult mice. In: Environmental Pollution. 2018 ; Vol. 241. pp. 279-288.
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