In vitro cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of myrrh oil on human gingival fibroblasts and epithelial cells

David Tipton, B. Lyle, H. Babich, M. Kh Dabbous

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Limited scientific studies suggest that myrrh (Commiphora molmol) has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. This study determined myrrh oil (MO) cytotoxicity to human gingival fibroblasts and epithelial cells and its effect, measured by ELISA, on interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 production. Cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by metabolic reduction of a tetrazolium salt to a formazan dye (MTT assay) and by release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from membrane damaged (LDH release assay) cells, respectively. Based on the MTT assay, 24- and 48-h exposures to ≤0.001% MO had little effect on fibroblast and epithelial cell (24-h only) viability. At 48 h, 0.0005-0.001% MO decreased epithelial cell viability 30-50%. After 24 and 48 h, MO, at ≥0.005%, maximally decreased viability of all cell lines. In the LDH release assay, exposure to ≤0.0001% MO caused <10% cytotoxicity to all cells. At 24 h, ≥0.0025% MO caused maximal cytotoxicity; ≤0.001% MO caused 10-70% cytotoxicity. At longer exposure times, epithelial cells were more susceptible to cytotoxic effects of MO. There was little or no detectable IL-1β-stimulated production of IL-6 or IL-8 by cells exposed to ≥0.0025% MO, probably reflective of loss of viability. At subtoxic MO levels (0.00001-0.001%), there was a significant reduction of IL-1β-stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 production by fibroblasts, but not by epithelial cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-310
Number of pages10
JournalToxicology in Vitro
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Fibroblasts
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Epithelial Cells
Cytotoxicity
Assays
Interleukin-8
Interleukin-1
L-Lactate Dehydrogenase
Interleukin-6
Cell Survival
Commiphora
Cells
myrrh oil
In Vitro Techniques
Tetrazolium Salts
Formazans
Coloring Agents
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Membranes
Cell Line

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology

Cite this

In vitro cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of myrrh oil on human gingival fibroblasts and epithelial cells. / Tipton, David; Lyle, B.; Babich, H.; Dabbous, M. Kh.

In: Toxicology in Vitro, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.01.2003, p. 301-310.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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