In vitro models for Candida biofilm development

Bastiaan P. Krom, Hubertine Willems

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Development of Candida spp. biofilms on medical devices such as catheters and voice prosthesis has been recognized as an increasing clinical problem. Different in vitro models are presented with increasing complexity. Each model system can be utilized for analysis of new active compounds to prevent or treat Candida biofilms as well as to study molecular processes involved in biofilm formation. Susceptibility studies of clinical isolates are generally performed in a simple 96-well model system similar to the CLSI standard. In the present chapter, optimized conditions that promote biofilm formation within individual wells of microtiter plates are described. In addition, the method has proven useful in preparing C. albicans biofilms for investigation by a variety of microscopic and molecular techniques. A more realistic and more complex biofilm system is presented by the Amsterdam Active Attachment (AAA) model. In this 24-well model all crucial steps of biofilm formation: adhesion, proliferation, and maturation, can be simulated on various surfaces, while still allowing a medium throughput approach. This model has been applied to study susceptibility, complex molecular mechanisms as well as interspecies (Candida–bacterium) interactions. Finally, a realistic microfluidics channel system is presented to follow dynamic processes in biofilm formation. In this Bioflux-based system, molecular mechanisms as well as dynamic processes can be studied at a high time-resolution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages95-105
Number of pages11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume1356
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

Fingerprint

Biofilms
Candida
Artificial Larynges
Microfluidics
In Vitro Techniques
Catheters
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Krom, B. P., & Willems, H. (2016). In vitro models for Candida biofilm development. In Methods in Molecular Biology (pp. 95-105). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1356). Humana Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-3052-4_8

In vitro models for Candida biofilm development. / Krom, Bastiaan P.; Willems, Hubertine.

Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc., 2016. p. 95-105 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1356).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Krom, BP & Willems, H 2016, In vitro models for Candida biofilm development. in Methods in Molecular Biology. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 1356, Humana Press Inc., pp. 95-105. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-3052-4_8
Krom BP, Willems H. In vitro models for Candida biofilm development. In Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc. 2016. p. 95-105. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-3052-4_8
Krom, Bastiaan P. ; Willems, Hubertine. / In vitro models for Candida biofilm development. Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc., 2016. pp. 95-105 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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