In vitro testing of current spread during ventricular catheter coagulation using diathermy

Technical note

Frederick Boop, Azedine Medhkour, John Honeycutt, Charles James, W. Bruce Cherny, Christopher Duntsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors report on the development of an anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm that hemorrhaged after monopolar coagulation for a ventricular catheter lodged in the interhemispheric fissure. After observing this complication, the authors developed a simple bench test that can be performed by any neurosurgeon to determine the safest coagulation parameters for any given diathermy unit. A modified grounding pad was placed in a beaker of a protein solution consisting of egg whites. Ventricular catheters were then placed in the solution, and a monopolar diathermy current was applied to a metal stylet at various wattages and for different durations of time. Inducing coagulation at 40 W with a diathermy unit produced flames emanating from around the pores of the catheter tip. Flash flames were also observed at 35 W, forming a coagulum of egg white for a distance of up to 1 cm from the catheter tip. All heat was dissipated through the holes of the first 16 mm of the catheter. At 20 W the flame was minimal and coagulation appeared adequate, whereas at 15 W only bubbles were seen around the tip together with suboptimal coagulum formation. This technique is a simple and effective means of determining the optimal setting for monopolar diathermy and can be used to figure the optimal catheter coagulation wattage for a given diathermy unit. Considering the results of this study, the authors have lowered the current for coagulation in ventricular catheters to 20 W.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-168
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of neurosurgery
Volume106
Issue number2 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007

Fingerprint

Diathermy
Catheters
Egg White
Anterior Cerebral Artery
False Aneurysm
In Vitro Techniques
Hot Temperature
Metals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Boop, F., Medhkour, A., Honeycutt, J., James, C., Cherny, W. B., & Duntsch, C. (2007). In vitro testing of current spread during ventricular catheter coagulation using diathermy: Technical note. Journal of neurosurgery, 106(2 SUPPL.), 165-168.

In vitro testing of current spread during ventricular catheter coagulation using diathermy : Technical note. / Boop, Frederick; Medhkour, Azedine; Honeycutt, John; James, Charles; Cherny, W. Bruce; Duntsch, Christopher.

In: Journal of neurosurgery, Vol. 106, No. 2 SUPPL., 01.02.2007, p. 165-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boop, F, Medhkour, A, Honeycutt, J, James, C, Cherny, WB & Duntsch, C 2007, 'In vitro testing of current spread during ventricular catheter coagulation using diathermy: Technical note', Journal of neurosurgery, vol. 106, no. 2 SUPPL., pp. 165-168.
Boop F, Medhkour A, Honeycutt J, James C, Cherny WB, Duntsch C. In vitro testing of current spread during ventricular catheter coagulation using diathermy: Technical note. Journal of neurosurgery. 2007 Feb 1;106(2 SUPPL.):165-168.
Boop, Frederick ; Medhkour, Azedine ; Honeycutt, John ; James, Charles ; Cherny, W. Bruce ; Duntsch, Christopher. / In vitro testing of current spread during ventricular catheter coagulation using diathermy : Technical note. In: Journal of neurosurgery. 2007 ; Vol. 106, No. 2 SUPPL. pp. 165-168.
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