Incidence and contributing factors to termination of the patient-physician relationship

Joseph Santoso, Edmundo Yibirin, Mary Crigger, Jim Wan, Adam C. ElNaggar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose Identify the incidence and factors contributing to the termination of gynecologic patient-physician relationships. Methods All patients terminated from the practice between January 2008 and December 2012 were identified. Charts were reviewed for demographic information, termination reason, and cancer diagnosis. Results In the five year study period, 8851 new patients presented to the division of gynecologic oncology. Within this cohort, 123 patient-physician relationships were terminated. Among terminated patients, missed appointments (63.4%), noncompliance to treatment (23.6%), disruptive behavior (10.6%), and drug abuse behavior (2.4%) were the key reasons for termination. While no patients were terminated for financial reason, statistical differences were found for those with Medicaid insurance (OR = 5; 95% CI: 3.4–7.1). Terminated patients were more likely to be younger, African American/Black, and have a diagnosis of GTD or cancer, particularly cervical cancer, when compared against all retained patients. Conclusion The prevalence of patient-physician relationship termination was low at 1.4% (123/8851). However, the finding that the 52% of terminated patients had a diagnosis of cancer is concerning; 73% of which had stage III or greater disease, or were unstaged. We hope that the identification and quantification of reasons for termination and those at risk for termination, as well as the introduction of patient-navigators, will lead to improved methods to ensure patient compliance and retention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-44
Number of pages3
JournalGynecologic Oncology Reports
Volume17
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Physician-Patient Relations
Incidence
Patient Navigation
Neoplasms
Medicaid
Patient Compliance
Insurance
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
African Americans
Substance-Related Disorders
Appointments and Schedules
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Oncology

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Incidence and contributing factors to termination of the patient-physician relationship. / Santoso, Joseph; Yibirin, Edmundo; Crigger, Mary; Wan, Jim; ElNaggar, Adam C.

In: Gynecologic Oncology Reports, Vol. 17, 01.08.2016, p. 42-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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