Incidence of hollow viscus injury in blunt trauma

An analysis from 275,557 trauma admissions from the EAST multi-institutional trial

EAST Multi-Institutional HVI Research Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

160 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Blunt hollow viscus injury (HVI) is uncommon. No sufficiently large series has studied the prevalence of these injuries in blunt trauma patients. This study defines the prevalence of blunt HVI, in addition to the associated morbidity and mortality rates for this diagnosis on the basis of a series of over 275,000 trauma admissions.Methods Patients with blunt small bowel injury (SBI) were identified from the registries of 95 trauma centers for a 2-year period (1998-1999). Each HVI patient (case) was matched by age and Injury Severity Score with a blunt trauma patient receiving an abdominal workup who did not have HVI (control). Patient level data were abstracted by individual chart review. Institution level data were collected on total numbers for trauma admission demographics and on total diagnostic examinations performed.Results From 275,557 trauma admissions, 227,972 blunt injury patients were identified. HVI was rare, with 2,632 patients identified from this group. Perforating small bowel injury accounted for less than 0.3% of blunt admissions. Mortality and morbidity were high for HVI. Controlling for injury severity, patients with HVI were usually at higher risk of death than non-HVI patients.Conclusion HVI is a rare but deadly phenomenon. The high mortality rates reflect the severity of the HVI and associated injuries. HVI patients should be carefully monitored for related injuries and complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-294
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trauma
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Nonpenetrating Wounds
Viscera
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries
Mortality
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Incidence of hollow viscus injury in blunt trauma : An analysis from 275,557 trauma admissions from the EAST multi-institutional trial. / EAST Multi-Institutional HVI Research Group.

In: Journal of Trauma, Vol. 54, No. 2, 01.01.2003, p. 289-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Incidence of hollow viscus injury in blunt trauma: An analysis from 275,557 trauma admissions from the EAST multi-institutional trial",
abstract = "Background Blunt hollow viscus injury (HVI) is uncommon. No sufficiently large series has studied the prevalence of these injuries in blunt trauma patients. This study defines the prevalence of blunt HVI, in addition to the associated morbidity and mortality rates for this diagnosis on the basis of a series of over 275,000 trauma admissions.Methods Patients with blunt small bowel injury (SBI) were identified from the registries of 95 trauma centers for a 2-year period (1998-1999). Each HVI patient (case) was matched by age and Injury Severity Score with a blunt trauma patient receiving an abdominal workup who did not have HVI (control). Patient level data were abstracted by individual chart review. Institution level data were collected on total numbers for trauma admission demographics and on total diagnostic examinations performed.Results From 275,557 trauma admissions, 227,972 blunt injury patients were identified. HVI was rare, with 2,632 patients identified from this group. Perforating small bowel injury accounted for less than 0.3{\%} of blunt admissions. Mortality and morbidity were high for HVI. Controlling for injury severity, patients with HVI were usually at higher risk of death than non-HVI patients.Conclusion HVI is a rare but deadly phenomenon. The high mortality rates reflect the severity of the HVI and associated injuries. HVI patients should be carefully monitored for related injuries and complications.",
author = "{EAST Multi-Institutional HVI Research Group} and Watts, {Dorraine D.} and Fakhry, {Samir M.} and Thomas Scalea and Carnell Cooper and Brian Daley and Blaine Enderson and Clancy, {Keith D.} and Peitzman, {Andrew B.} and Pasquale, {Michael D.} and Kurek, {Stanley J.} and Malhotra, {Ajai K.} and Fabian, {Timothy C.} and Brian Daley and Blaine Enderson and Jeffrey Morken and Ney, {Arthur L.} and Liu, {Terrence H.} and Moore, {Frederick A.} and Eddy Carrillo and James Lukan and Bernard Boulanger and Knotts, {F. Barry} and Shreve, {Wendy Sue} and Bilello, {John F.} and Davis, {James W.} and Ivan Puente and Cohen, {Sharon S.} and Layke, {John C.} and Scott Monk and Robert Marburger and Tiffany Bee and Englewood, {William F.} and Norwooenter, {Scott H.} and Alliance, {Pamela A.} and Jones, {Larry M.} and Luchette, {Fred A.} and Patterson, {Lisa A.} and Daniel Powers and Jacobs, {David G.} and G. Ronald and Mitchell Scott and P. Jeffrey and Sherry Melton and M. Michael and C. Michael and Mauricio Lynn and Frei, {Lonnie W.} and Dennis Wang and Peter Rhee and Timothy Fabian",
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T1 - Incidence of hollow viscus injury in blunt trauma

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AU - EAST Multi-Institutional HVI Research Group

AU - Watts, Dorraine D.

AU - Fakhry, Samir M.

AU - Scalea, Thomas

AU - Cooper, Carnell

AU - Daley, Brian

AU - Enderson, Blaine

AU - Clancy, Keith D.

AU - Peitzman, Andrew B.

AU - Pasquale, Michael D.

AU - Kurek, Stanley J.

AU - Malhotra, Ajai K.

AU - Fabian, Timothy C.

AU - Daley, Brian

AU - Enderson, Blaine

AU - Morken, Jeffrey

AU - Ney, Arthur L.

AU - Liu, Terrence H.

AU - Moore, Frederick A.

AU - Carrillo, Eddy

AU - Lukan, James

AU - Boulanger, Bernard

AU - Knotts, F. Barry

AU - Shreve, Wendy Sue

AU - Bilello, John F.

AU - Davis, James W.

AU - Puente, Ivan

AU - Cohen, Sharon S.

AU - Layke, John C.

AU - Monk, Scott

AU - Marburger, Robert

AU - Bee, Tiffany

AU - Englewood, William F.

AU - Norwooenter, Scott H.

AU - Alliance, Pamela A.

AU - Jones, Larry M.

AU - Luchette, Fred A.

AU - Patterson, Lisa A.

AU - Powers, Daniel

AU - Jacobs, David G.

AU - Ronald, G.

AU - Scott, Mitchell

AU - Jeffrey, P.

AU - Melton, Sherry

AU - Michael, M.

AU - Michael, C.

AU - Lynn, Mauricio

AU - Frei, Lonnie W.

AU - Wang, Dennis

AU - Rhee, Peter

AU - Fabian, Timothy

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N2 - Background Blunt hollow viscus injury (HVI) is uncommon. No sufficiently large series has studied the prevalence of these injuries in blunt trauma patients. This study defines the prevalence of blunt HVI, in addition to the associated morbidity and mortality rates for this diagnosis on the basis of a series of over 275,000 trauma admissions.Methods Patients with blunt small bowel injury (SBI) were identified from the registries of 95 trauma centers for a 2-year period (1998-1999). Each HVI patient (case) was matched by age and Injury Severity Score with a blunt trauma patient receiving an abdominal workup who did not have HVI (control). Patient level data were abstracted by individual chart review. Institution level data were collected on total numbers for trauma admission demographics and on total diagnostic examinations performed.Results From 275,557 trauma admissions, 227,972 blunt injury patients were identified. HVI was rare, with 2,632 patients identified from this group. Perforating small bowel injury accounted for less than 0.3% of blunt admissions. Mortality and morbidity were high for HVI. Controlling for injury severity, patients with HVI were usually at higher risk of death than non-HVI patients.Conclusion HVI is a rare but deadly phenomenon. The high mortality rates reflect the severity of the HVI and associated injuries. HVI patients should be carefully monitored for related injuries and complications.

AB - Background Blunt hollow viscus injury (HVI) is uncommon. No sufficiently large series has studied the prevalence of these injuries in blunt trauma patients. This study defines the prevalence of blunt HVI, in addition to the associated morbidity and mortality rates for this diagnosis on the basis of a series of over 275,000 trauma admissions.Methods Patients with blunt small bowel injury (SBI) were identified from the registries of 95 trauma centers for a 2-year period (1998-1999). Each HVI patient (case) was matched by age and Injury Severity Score with a blunt trauma patient receiving an abdominal workup who did not have HVI (control). Patient level data were abstracted by individual chart review. Institution level data were collected on total numbers for trauma admission demographics and on total diagnostic examinations performed.Results From 275,557 trauma admissions, 227,972 blunt injury patients were identified. HVI was rare, with 2,632 patients identified from this group. Perforating small bowel injury accounted for less than 0.3% of blunt admissions. Mortality and morbidity were high for HVI. Controlling for injury severity, patients with HVI were usually at higher risk of death than non-HVI patients.Conclusion HVI is a rare but deadly phenomenon. The high mortality rates reflect the severity of the HVI and associated injuries. HVI patients should be carefully monitored for related injuries and complications.

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U2 - 10.1097/01.TA.0000046261.06976.6A

DO - 10.1097/01.TA.0000046261.06976.6A

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EP - 294

JO - Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery

JF - Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery

SN - 2163-0755

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