Incidence of sleep disorders reported by patients at UTHSC College of Dentistry

A two-year follow-up and proposed educational program

Chris Ivanoff, Frank Pancratz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 2011 study at one U.S. dental school found that patients were not routinely screened by dental students for obstructive sleep apnea and/or other related sleep disorders, nor were students being trained to screen. Consequently, the medical history questionnaire used in the clinic was updated to include five specific screening questions. The aim of this two-year follow-up study was to determine whether screening had improved at the school. A retrospective chart review of all patients (age 14-70+) in the third- and fourth-year dental clinics in 2012 and 2013 searched for "YES" responses to the five questions. Of 5,931 patients, 38% reported they snore or were told they snore. By age 50-59, their reports of snoring increased to 50%. About 5% reported incidents waking up choking. By age 50, between one-fifth and one-quarter indicated they woke up frequently during the night. One in six frequently felt overly tired during the daytime, often falling asleep. This problem was evenly reported by all age groups between ages 30 and 69. About half the patients reporting sleep problems also had hypertension and cardiovascular problems with an equal distribution between males and females. The results showed that updating the medical history form had dramatically improved screening for sleep-disordered breathing by these dental students. Though screening is neither a definitive diagnosis nor an attempt to distinguish among sleep disorders, the results correlate with national statistics. Screening is an important step to increase student awareness of this serious health trend as it prepares students to engage more constructively in its management and referral.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)548-556
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Dental Education
Volume79
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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dentistry
Dentistry
sleep
educational program
incidence
Dental Students
Incidence
Students
student
Dental Clinics
Dental Schools
Snoring
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Airway Obstruction
hypertension
Sleep
Referral and Consultation
Age Groups
school

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Incidence of sleep disorders reported by patients at UTHSC College of Dentistry : A two-year follow-up and proposed educational program. / Ivanoff, Chris; Pancratz, Frank.

In: Journal of Dental Education, Vol. 79, No. 5, 01.01.2015, p. 548-556.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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