Increased proliferation, collagen, and fibronectin production by hereditary gingival fibromatosis fibroblasts

David Tipton, Karen J. Howell, Mustafa Kh Dabbous

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a fibrotic enlargement of the gingiva. HGF gingiva contains large amounts of interstitial collagen and other extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Increased proliferation and elevated production of the ECM molecules type I collagen and fibronectin (FN) could contribute to the clinical increased bulk of HGF gingiva. Fibroblast strains from HGF gingiva and normal human gingival fibroblast strains (GN) were used in this in vitro study. Fibroblast proliferation was determined by ELISA which measured the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine into DNA. The results showed that HGF fibroblast strains proliferated more rapidly than GN fibroblasts (68% to 488% increase, depending on the strains) (P ≤ 0.01), the only exception being one HGF strain versus one normal strain. All HGF strains produced greater amounts of FN (measured by ELISA) than all of the normal fibroblast strains (23% to 49% increase, depending on the strain) (P ≤ 0.04). Similarly, all HGF strains made significantly greater (P ≤ 0.03) amounts of type I collagen (also measured by ELISA) than all of the normal strains (55% to 235% increase, depending on the strain). The results show that, in vitro, HGF fibroblasts display several phenotypic characteristics of activated fibroblasts: increased proliferative rates as well as increased production of FN and type I collagen, consistent with in vitro studies of fibroblasts derived from other types of fibrotic tissue. These results suggest that the increased proliferation of HGF fibroblasts and their increased production of extracellular matrix molecules such as collagen and FN may contribute to the clinical gingival enlargement characteristic of HGF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)524-530
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Periodontology
Volume68
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Fibronectins
Collagen
Fibroblasts
Gingival Fibromatosis
Collagen Type I
Extracellular Matrix
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Fibromatosis, Gingival, Type 1
Gingiva
Bromodeoxyuridine
DNA

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Periodontics

Cite this

Increased proliferation, collagen, and fibronectin production by hereditary gingival fibromatosis fibroblasts. / Tipton, David; Howell, Karen J.; Dabbous, Mustafa Kh.

In: Journal of Periodontology, Vol. 68, No. 6, 01.01.1997, p. 524-530.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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