Increasing prevalence of methicillin resistance in serious ocular infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus in the United States

2000 to 2005

Penny Asbell, Daniel F. Sahm, Mary Shaw, Deborah C. Draghi, Nina P. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To report the nationwide prevalence of methicillin resistance in serious ocular infections involving Staphylococcus aureus and profile in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of S aureus from ocular isolates over time. Setting: Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. Methods: Data on S aureus submitted to The Surveillance Network (TSN) by more than 200 laboratories in the United States from January 2000 to December 2005 were reviewed. The prevalence of methicillin resistance in S aureus ocular infections and in vitro susceptibility to antibiotic agents commonly used to treat or prevent ocular infections were determined. Results: The proportion of S aureus infections culture-positive for methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) increased from 29.5% in 2000 to 41.6% in 2005. The MRSA ocular isolates were multidrug resistant; that is, in vitro resistance to 3 antibiotic agents or more, including all fluoroquinolones tested. Conclusions: Multidrug-resistant MRSA is increasing in serious ocular infections. Based on the rate of increase in the TSN database, MRSA cultures from serious ocular infections could be more common than methicillin-susceptible S aureus within 2 to 3 years. Large-scale national surveillance programs are needed to monitor in vitro antimicrobial resistance trends in ocular isolates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)814-818
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008

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Eye Infections
Methicillin Resistance
Staphylococcus aureus
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Methicillin
Fluoroquinolones
Medicine
Databases
In Vitro Techniques
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Increasing prevalence of methicillin resistance in serious ocular infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus in the United States : 2000 to 2005. / Asbell, Penny; Sahm, Daniel F.; Shaw, Mary; Draghi, Deborah C.; Brown, Nina P.

In: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, Vol. 34, No. 5, 01.05.2008, p. 814-818.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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