Infant Positioning, Baby Gear Use, and Cranial Asymmetry

Anne Zachry, Vikki G. Nolan, Sarah B. Hand, Susan A. Klemm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives This study aimed to identify predictors of cranial asymmetry. We hypothesize that among infants diagnosed with cranial asymmetry in the sampled region, there is an association between exposure to more time in baby gear and less awake time in prone and side-lying than in infants who do not present with this condition. Methods The study employed a cross sectional survey of caregivers of typically developing infants and infants diagnosed with cranial asymmetry. Results A mutivariable model reveals that caregivers of children who are diagnosed with cranial asymmetry report their children spending significantly less time in prone play than those children without a diagnosis of cranial asymmetry. Side-lying and time spent in baby gear did not attain statistical significance. Conclusions for Practice Occupational therapists, physical therapists, pediatricians, nurses and other health care professionals must provide parents with early education about the importance of varying positions and prone play in infancy and address fears and concerns that may serve as barriers to providing prone playtime.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2229-2236
Number of pages8
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Caregivers
Prone Position
Physical Therapists
Fear
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parents
Nurses
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Pediatricians
Occupational Therapists

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Infant Positioning, Baby Gear Use, and Cranial Asymmetry. / Zachry, Anne; Nolan, Vikki G.; Hand, Sarah B.; Klemm, Susan A.

In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, Vol. 21, No. 12, 01.12.2017, p. 2229-2236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zachry, Anne ; Nolan, Vikki G. ; Hand, Sarah B. ; Klemm, Susan A. / Infant Positioning, Baby Gear Use, and Cranial Asymmetry. In: Maternal and Child Health Journal. 2017 ; Vol. 21, No. 12. pp. 2229-2236.
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