Infarct scar

A dynamic tissue

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

379 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infarct scar, a requisite to the rebuilding of necrotic myocardium following myocardial infarction (MI), has long been considered inert. Earlier morphologic studies suggested healing at the infarct site was complete within 6-8 weeks following MI and resultant scar tissue, albeit necessary, was acellular and simply fibrillar collagen. Utilizing molecular and cellular biologic technologies, recent studies indicate otherwise. Infarct scar is composed of phenotypically transformed fibroblast-like cells, termed myofibroblasts (myoFb) because they express alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and these microfilaments confer contractile behavior in response to various peptides and amines. These cells are nourished by a neovasculature and are persistent at the MI site, where they are metabolically active expressing components requisite to angiotensin (Ang) peptide generation, including converting enzyme, receptors for AngII and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. They continue to elaborate fibrillar type I collagen. Their generation of these peptides contribute to ongoing scar tissue collagen turnover and to fibrous tissue formation of noninfarcted myocardium. Infarct scar contraction accounts for its thinning and its tonus may contribute to abnormal ventricular chamber stiffness with diastolic dysfunction. Infarct scar is a dynamic tissue: cellular, vascularized, metabolically active and contractile. Pharmacologic interventions with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor or AT1 receptor antagonist has proven effective in attenuating scar tissue metabolic activity and minimizing adverse accumulation of fibrous tissue in noninfarcted myocardium. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-256
Number of pages7
JournalCardiovascular Research
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2000

Fingerprint

Cicatrix
Fibrillar Collagens
Myocardium
Myocardial Infarction
Peptides
Myofibroblasts
Angiotensins
Transforming Growth Factors
Actin Cytoskeleton
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Amines
Smooth Muscle
Catalytic Domain
Collagen
Fibroblasts
Technology
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Infarct scar : A dynamic tissue. / Sun, Yao; Weber, Karl.

In: Cardiovascular Research, Vol. 46, No. 2, 01.05.2000, p. 250-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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