Inflammatory ocular diseases and sphingolipid signaling

Richard Grambergs, Koushik Mondal, Nawajes Mandal

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Inflammation is a powerful immune countermeasure to tissue damage and infection. The inflammatory response is complex and requires the involvement of myriad signaling pathways and metabolic processes, all governed by a multitude of regulatory systems. Although inflammation is a vital defense against tissue injury and a necessary step in tissue healing, the mechanisms which modulate the initiation, intensity, and duration of this innate immune response can malfunction and result in inappropriate or out-of-control inflammation, even in the absence of an appropriate stimulus. Though the human eye exists in an immune-privileged microenvironment, it is not spared from this. The eye is neither devoid of immune cells nor is it fully sequestered from systemic immune responses, and is therefore fully capable of ruining itself through localized inflammatory dysfunction and systemic inflammatory disease (Taylor AW, Front Immunol 7:37, 2016; Zhou R, Caspi RR, Biol Rep 2, 2010). In fact, a wide range of ocular inflammatory diseases exist and are major causes of blindness in humans. Advances in the understanding of inflammatory processes have revealed new key pathways and molecular factors involved in the mechanisms of inflammation. Lipids and sphingolipids are increasingly being recognized as having important signaling roles in the pathophysiology of ocular inflammatory diseases. What follows below is a discussion of fundamental inflammatory processes, the place of sphingolipids as mediators of said processes, brief descriptions of major inflammatory ocular diseases, and new findings implicating sphingolipids in their pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer New York LLC
Pages139-152
Number of pages14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume1159
ISSN (Print)0065-2598
ISSN (Electronic)2214-8019

Fingerprint

Sphingolipids
Eye Diseases
Inflammation
Tissue
Blindness
Innate Immunity
Lipids
Wounds and Injuries
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Grambergs, R., Mondal, K., & Mandal, N. (2019). Inflammatory ocular diseases and sphingolipid signaling. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (pp. 139-152). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1159). Springer New York LLC. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-21162-2_8

Inflammatory ocular diseases and sphingolipid signaling. / Grambergs, Richard; Mondal, Koushik; Mandal, Nawajes.

Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2019. p. 139-152 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1159).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Grambergs, R, Mondal, K & Mandal, N 2019, Inflammatory ocular diseases and sphingolipid signaling. in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 1159, Springer New York LLC, pp. 139-152. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-21162-2_8
Grambergs R, Mondal K, Mandal N. Inflammatory ocular diseases and sphingolipid signaling. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC. 2019. p. 139-152. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-21162-2_8
Grambergs, Richard ; Mondal, Koushik ; Mandal, Nawajes. / Inflammatory ocular diseases and sphingolipid signaling. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2019. pp. 139-152 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
@inbook{922b672b06d246998eabb9e757028f58,
title = "Inflammatory ocular diseases and sphingolipid signaling",
abstract = "Inflammation is a powerful immune countermeasure to tissue damage and infection. The inflammatory response is complex and requires the involvement of myriad signaling pathways and metabolic processes, all governed by a multitude of regulatory systems. Although inflammation is a vital defense against tissue injury and a necessary step in tissue healing, the mechanisms which modulate the initiation, intensity, and duration of this innate immune response can malfunction and result in inappropriate or out-of-control inflammation, even in the absence of an appropriate stimulus. Though the human eye exists in an immune-privileged microenvironment, it is not spared from this. The eye is neither devoid of immune cells nor is it fully sequestered from systemic immune responses, and is therefore fully capable of ruining itself through localized inflammatory dysfunction and systemic inflammatory disease (Taylor AW, Front Immunol 7:37, 2016; Zhou R, Caspi RR, Biol Rep 2, 2010). In fact, a wide range of ocular inflammatory diseases exist and are major causes of blindness in humans. Advances in the understanding of inflammatory processes have revealed new key pathways and molecular factors involved in the mechanisms of inflammation. Lipids and sphingolipids are increasingly being recognized as having important signaling roles in the pathophysiology of ocular inflammatory diseases. What follows below is a discussion of fundamental inflammatory processes, the place of sphingolipids as mediators of said processes, brief descriptions of major inflammatory ocular diseases, and new findings implicating sphingolipids in their pathogenesis.",
author = "Richard Grambergs and Koushik Mondal and Nawajes Mandal",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-030-21162-2_8",
language = "English (US)",
series = "Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology",
publisher = "Springer New York LLC",
pages = "139--152",
booktitle = "Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Inflammatory ocular diseases and sphingolipid signaling

AU - Grambergs, Richard

AU - Mondal, Koushik

AU - Mandal, Nawajes

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Inflammation is a powerful immune countermeasure to tissue damage and infection. The inflammatory response is complex and requires the involvement of myriad signaling pathways and metabolic processes, all governed by a multitude of regulatory systems. Although inflammation is a vital defense against tissue injury and a necessary step in tissue healing, the mechanisms which modulate the initiation, intensity, and duration of this innate immune response can malfunction and result in inappropriate or out-of-control inflammation, even in the absence of an appropriate stimulus. Though the human eye exists in an immune-privileged microenvironment, it is not spared from this. The eye is neither devoid of immune cells nor is it fully sequestered from systemic immune responses, and is therefore fully capable of ruining itself through localized inflammatory dysfunction and systemic inflammatory disease (Taylor AW, Front Immunol 7:37, 2016; Zhou R, Caspi RR, Biol Rep 2, 2010). In fact, a wide range of ocular inflammatory diseases exist and are major causes of blindness in humans. Advances in the understanding of inflammatory processes have revealed new key pathways and molecular factors involved in the mechanisms of inflammation. Lipids and sphingolipids are increasingly being recognized as having important signaling roles in the pathophysiology of ocular inflammatory diseases. What follows below is a discussion of fundamental inflammatory processes, the place of sphingolipids as mediators of said processes, brief descriptions of major inflammatory ocular diseases, and new findings implicating sphingolipids in their pathogenesis.

AB - Inflammation is a powerful immune countermeasure to tissue damage and infection. The inflammatory response is complex and requires the involvement of myriad signaling pathways and metabolic processes, all governed by a multitude of regulatory systems. Although inflammation is a vital defense against tissue injury and a necessary step in tissue healing, the mechanisms which modulate the initiation, intensity, and duration of this innate immune response can malfunction and result in inappropriate or out-of-control inflammation, even in the absence of an appropriate stimulus. Though the human eye exists in an immune-privileged microenvironment, it is not spared from this. The eye is neither devoid of immune cells nor is it fully sequestered from systemic immune responses, and is therefore fully capable of ruining itself through localized inflammatory dysfunction and systemic inflammatory disease (Taylor AW, Front Immunol 7:37, 2016; Zhou R, Caspi RR, Biol Rep 2, 2010). In fact, a wide range of ocular inflammatory diseases exist and are major causes of blindness in humans. Advances in the understanding of inflammatory processes have revealed new key pathways and molecular factors involved in the mechanisms of inflammation. Lipids and sphingolipids are increasingly being recognized as having important signaling roles in the pathophysiology of ocular inflammatory diseases. What follows below is a discussion of fundamental inflammatory processes, the place of sphingolipids as mediators of said processes, brief descriptions of major inflammatory ocular diseases, and new findings implicating sphingolipids in their pathogenesis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071964048&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85071964048&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-030-21162-2_8

DO - 10.1007/978-3-030-21162-2_8

M3 - Chapter

C2 - 31502203

AN - SCOPUS:85071964048

T3 - Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology

SP - 139

EP - 152

BT - Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology

PB - Springer New York LLC

ER -