Influence of traumatic brain injury on potassium and phosphorus homeostasis in critically ill multiple trauma patients

Kimberly A. Lindsey, Rex Brown, George O. Maish, Martin Croce, Gayle Minard, Roland Dickerson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The intent of this study was to ascertain whether multiple trauma patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) had lower serum concentrations of potassium and phosphorus and required more aggressive supplementation than multiple trauma patients without TBI. Methods: Ventilator-dependent adult patients without renal impairment who were admitted to the trauma intensive care unit or neurosurgical intensive care unit and who received enteral nutrition were evaluated for the first 14 d after hospital admission. Patients were grouped according to the presence or absence of TBI. Target serum concentrations for potassium and phosphorus were 4 mEq/L and 4 mg/dL, respectively. Electrolyte repletion therapy was given according to the nutritional support service guidelines. Results: Fifty trauma patients (25 with and without TBI) were studied. Daily serum potassium concentrations were consistently lower for those with TBI (P ≤ 0.001), whereas the mean net potassium intake was greater (1.3 ± 0.5 versus 0.7 ± 0.3 mEq · kg-1 · d-1, respectively, P ≤ 0.001). Serial serum phosphorus concentrations were similar between groups (P = NS) except for a significantly lower serum phosphorus concentration for trauma patients with TBI on day 3 after hospital admission (2.5 ± 0.5 versus 2.9 ± 0.7 mg/dL, respectively, P ≤ 0.05). However, the mean net phosphorus intake was significantly greater for trauma patients with TBI (0.65 ± 0.25 versus 0.45 ± 0.17 mmol · kg-1 · d-1, P ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: Potassium and phosphorus requirements are greater for multiple trauma patients with TBI compared with those without TBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)784-790
Number of pages7
JournalNutrition
Volume26
Issue number7-8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010

Fingerprint

Multiple Trauma
Critical Illness
Phosphorus
Potassium
Homeostasis
Serum
Wounds and Injuries
Intensive Care Units
Traumatic Brain Injury
Nutritional Support
Enteral Nutrition
Mechanical Ventilators
Electrolytes
Guidelines
Kidney

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Influence of traumatic brain injury on potassium and phosphorus homeostasis in critically ill multiple trauma patients. / Lindsey, Kimberly A.; Brown, Rex; Maish, George O.; Croce, Martin; Minard, Gayle; Dickerson, Roland.

In: Nutrition, Vol. 26, No. 7-8, 01.07.2010, p. 784-790.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lindsey, Kimberly A. ; Brown, Rex ; Maish, George O. ; Croce, Martin ; Minard, Gayle ; Dickerson, Roland. / Influence of traumatic brain injury on potassium and phosphorus homeostasis in critically ill multiple trauma patients. In: Nutrition. 2010 ; Vol. 26, No. 7-8. pp. 784-790.
@article{9331da61f2374db4aea0d2de994736f3,
title = "Influence of traumatic brain injury on potassium and phosphorus homeostasis in critically ill multiple trauma patients",
abstract = "Objective: The intent of this study was to ascertain whether multiple trauma patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) had lower serum concentrations of potassium and phosphorus and required more aggressive supplementation than multiple trauma patients without TBI. Methods: Ventilator-dependent adult patients without renal impairment who were admitted to the trauma intensive care unit or neurosurgical intensive care unit and who received enteral nutrition were evaluated for the first 14 d after hospital admission. Patients were grouped according to the presence or absence of TBI. Target serum concentrations for potassium and phosphorus were 4 mEq/L and 4 mg/dL, respectively. Electrolyte repletion therapy was given according to the nutritional support service guidelines. Results: Fifty trauma patients (25 with and without TBI) were studied. Daily serum potassium concentrations were consistently lower for those with TBI (P ≤ 0.001), whereas the mean net potassium intake was greater (1.3 ± 0.5 versus 0.7 ± 0.3 mEq · kg-1 · d-1, respectively, P ≤ 0.001). Serial serum phosphorus concentrations were similar between groups (P = NS) except for a significantly lower serum phosphorus concentration for trauma patients with TBI on day 3 after hospital admission (2.5 ± 0.5 versus 2.9 ± 0.7 mg/dL, respectively, P ≤ 0.05). However, the mean net phosphorus intake was significantly greater for trauma patients with TBI (0.65 ± 0.25 versus 0.45 ± 0.17 mmol · kg-1 · d-1, P ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: Potassium and phosphorus requirements are greater for multiple trauma patients with TBI compared with those without TBI.",
author = "Lindsey, {Kimberly A.} and Rex Brown and Maish, {George O.} and Martin Croce and Gayle Minard and Roland Dickerson",
year = "2010",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.nut.2009.08.013",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "784--790",
journal = "Nutrition",
issn = "0899-9007",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "7-8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of traumatic brain injury on potassium and phosphorus homeostasis in critically ill multiple trauma patients

AU - Lindsey, Kimberly A.

AU - Brown, Rex

AU - Maish, George O.

AU - Croce, Martin

AU - Minard, Gayle

AU - Dickerson, Roland

PY - 2010/7/1

Y1 - 2010/7/1

N2 - Objective: The intent of this study was to ascertain whether multiple trauma patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) had lower serum concentrations of potassium and phosphorus and required more aggressive supplementation than multiple trauma patients without TBI. Methods: Ventilator-dependent adult patients without renal impairment who were admitted to the trauma intensive care unit or neurosurgical intensive care unit and who received enteral nutrition were evaluated for the first 14 d after hospital admission. Patients were grouped according to the presence or absence of TBI. Target serum concentrations for potassium and phosphorus were 4 mEq/L and 4 mg/dL, respectively. Electrolyte repletion therapy was given according to the nutritional support service guidelines. Results: Fifty trauma patients (25 with and without TBI) were studied. Daily serum potassium concentrations were consistently lower for those with TBI (P ≤ 0.001), whereas the mean net potassium intake was greater (1.3 ± 0.5 versus 0.7 ± 0.3 mEq · kg-1 · d-1, respectively, P ≤ 0.001). Serial serum phosphorus concentrations were similar between groups (P = NS) except for a significantly lower serum phosphorus concentration for trauma patients with TBI on day 3 after hospital admission (2.5 ± 0.5 versus 2.9 ± 0.7 mg/dL, respectively, P ≤ 0.05). However, the mean net phosphorus intake was significantly greater for trauma patients with TBI (0.65 ± 0.25 versus 0.45 ± 0.17 mmol · kg-1 · d-1, P ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: Potassium and phosphorus requirements are greater for multiple trauma patients with TBI compared with those without TBI.

AB - Objective: The intent of this study was to ascertain whether multiple trauma patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) had lower serum concentrations of potassium and phosphorus and required more aggressive supplementation than multiple trauma patients without TBI. Methods: Ventilator-dependent adult patients without renal impairment who were admitted to the trauma intensive care unit or neurosurgical intensive care unit and who received enteral nutrition were evaluated for the first 14 d after hospital admission. Patients were grouped according to the presence or absence of TBI. Target serum concentrations for potassium and phosphorus were 4 mEq/L and 4 mg/dL, respectively. Electrolyte repletion therapy was given according to the nutritional support service guidelines. Results: Fifty trauma patients (25 with and without TBI) were studied. Daily serum potassium concentrations were consistently lower for those with TBI (P ≤ 0.001), whereas the mean net potassium intake was greater (1.3 ± 0.5 versus 0.7 ± 0.3 mEq · kg-1 · d-1, respectively, P ≤ 0.001). Serial serum phosphorus concentrations were similar between groups (P = NS) except for a significantly lower serum phosphorus concentration for trauma patients with TBI on day 3 after hospital admission (2.5 ± 0.5 versus 2.9 ± 0.7 mg/dL, respectively, P ≤ 0.05). However, the mean net phosphorus intake was significantly greater for trauma patients with TBI (0.65 ± 0.25 versus 0.45 ± 0.17 mmol · kg-1 · d-1, P ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: Potassium and phosphorus requirements are greater for multiple trauma patients with TBI compared with those without TBI.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77953811551&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77953811551&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.nut.2009.08.013

DO - 10.1016/j.nut.2009.08.013

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 784

EP - 790

JO - Nutrition

JF - Nutrition

SN - 0899-9007

IS - 7-8

ER -