Influences of the location of vertebral 'IAR' on cervical spine kinematics

Thomas H. Jansen, Denis Diangelo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Different spine models have placed the IAR at various locations in the spine; more commonly, the central region of the intervertebral disk, the middle region of the subjacent vertebra, and the central region of the vertebral body. A computer simulation model of the cervical spine (C2-T1) was developed to investigate sagittal plane kinematics for different placements of the vertebral axis of rotation. Stiffness of the motion segment units was modeled with rotational springs. The combined loading vector applied to the spine replicated the in vitro experimental test results generated in our laboratory. Equal stiffnesses of each vertebra were used. The difference in force magnitude amongst the different cases was less than 1% of the applied load. Although the changes in rotational magnitudes were small, the relative differences varied not only with the different models, but also amongst the different vertebral levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSouthern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings
EditorsJ.D. Bumgardner, A.D. Puckett
PublisherIEEE
Pages331-333
Number of pages3
StatePublished - 1997
EventProceedings of the 1997 16th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Biloxi, MS, USA
Duration: Apr 4 1997Apr 6 1997

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1997 16th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference
CityBiloxi, MS, USA
Period4/4/974/6/97

Fingerprint

Kinematics
Stiffness
Computer simulation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Jansen, T. H., & Diangelo, D. (1997). Influences of the location of vertebral 'IAR' on cervical spine kinematics. In J. D. Bumgardner, & A. D. Puckett (Eds.), Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings (pp. 331-333). IEEE.

Influences of the location of vertebral 'IAR' on cervical spine kinematics. / Jansen, Thomas H.; Diangelo, Denis.

Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings. ed. / J.D. Bumgardner; A.D. Puckett. IEEE, 1997. p. 331-333.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Jansen, TH & Diangelo, D 1997, Influences of the location of vertebral 'IAR' on cervical spine kinematics. in JD Bumgardner & AD Puckett (eds), Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings. IEEE, pp. 331-333, Proceedings of the 1997 16th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, Biloxi, MS, USA, 4/4/97.
Jansen TH, Diangelo D. Influences of the location of vertebral 'IAR' on cervical spine kinematics. In Bumgardner JD, Puckett AD, editors, Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings. IEEE. 1997. p. 331-333
Jansen, Thomas H. ; Diangelo, Denis. / Influences of the location of vertebral 'IAR' on cervical spine kinematics. Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings. editor / J.D. Bumgardner ; A.D. Puckett. IEEE, 1997. pp. 331-333
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