Informal caregiving

Dilemmas of sandwiched caregivers

Rose M. Rubin, Shelley White-Means

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increased demand will intensify pressures for informal caregiving, especially for sandwiched caregivers. Using 1999, National Long Term Care Survey data, we contrasted socio-demographic statistics, care environments, activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) assistance, life quality, and employment burden of sandwiched versus non-sandwiched parental caregivers. Regression analysis explored variables influencing caregiving hours, employment accommodation, stress, strain, time for self, social life limits, free time, and excess burden. We found no differences in caregiving hours, no greater labor force accommodation, but lower quality of life among sandwiched caregivers with more than they can handle, but they undertook parent care despite quality of life reduction. Uniquely, the research indicates sandwiched caregivers' employment mitigates stress, strain, and burden and supports policy changes providing more supportive workplace environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)252-267
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Family and Economic Issues
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

Fingerprint

Caregivers
Activities of Daily Living
Quality of Life
Long-Term Care
Workplace
Regression Analysis
Demography
Pressure
Caregiving
Research
Activities of daily living
Burden
Quality of life
Accommodation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Informal caregiving : Dilemmas of sandwiched caregivers. / Rubin, Rose M.; White-Means, Shelley.

In: Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Vol. 30, No. 3, 01.07.2009, p. 252-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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