Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm

Aortoenteric fistula

Raymond A. Dieter, George B. Kuzycz, Raymond Dieter

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Aortic disease continues to be a problem for the medical community and may involve any part of the aorta from the aortic valve to the iliac vessels. The need for correction of these lesions depends on the type of lesion, the patient’s symptoms, and the risk or difficulty of repair. In the abdominal aorta, the most common lesions include aneurysmal formation (especially below the renal arteries) and total aortic occlusion due primarily to the atherosclerotic disease processes – the Leriche syndrome. These lesions occur primarily in the elderly and may present as both acute and chronic situations. The acute process usually involves acute expansion, leak, or rupture of a saccular aortic aneurysm (Fig. 31.1). The chronic problem usually is a slowly progressive expansion of an aneurysm or progressive stenosis and occlusion of the distal aorta. Both endovascular and open techniques may be used to correct the problem. However, either technique may be complicated by infection or fistula formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEndovascular Interventions
Subtitle of host publicationA Case-Based Approach
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages367-372
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781461473121
ISBN (Print)9781461473114
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Fistula
Aneurysm
Aorta
Leriche Syndrome
Aortic Diseases
Endovascular Procedures
Aortic Aneurysm
Abdominal Aorta
Renal Artery
Aortic Valve
Rupture
Pathologic Constriction
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dieter, R. A., Kuzycz, G. B., & Dieter, R. (2014). Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm: Aortoenteric fistula. In Endovascular Interventions: A Case-Based Approach (pp. 367-372). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7312-1_31

Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm : Aortoenteric fistula. / Dieter, Raymond A.; Kuzycz, George B.; Dieter, Raymond.

Endovascular Interventions: A Case-Based Approach. Springer New York, 2014. p. 367-372.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Dieter, RA, Kuzycz, GB & Dieter, R 2014, Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm: Aortoenteric fistula. in Endovascular Interventions: A Case-Based Approach. Springer New York, pp. 367-372. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7312-1_31
Dieter RA, Kuzycz GB, Dieter R. Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm: Aortoenteric fistula. In Endovascular Interventions: A Case-Based Approach. Springer New York. 2014. p. 367-372 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7312-1_31
Dieter, Raymond A. ; Kuzycz, George B. ; Dieter, Raymond. / Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm : Aortoenteric fistula. Endovascular Interventions: A Case-Based Approach. Springer New York, 2014. pp. 367-372
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